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The UCL Institute of Archaeology is delighted to host the 41st annual Theoretical Archaeology Group Conference in December 2019. Founded in 1937, the Institute is one of the largest centres for world archaeology, archaeological sciences and heritage & museum studies in the UK, situated in the heart of the capital.

Venue: UCL Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL

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Monday, December 16
 

11:30am

Petrie Museum Special Access
**Please note this is only open to TAG2019 delegates**

Delegates arriving early into London on Monday 16th are invited to this rare opportunity to experience the Petrie Museum and its designated, internationally significant, collection of Egyptian and Sudanese archaeology outside of normal public opening hours.



Monday December 16, 2019 11:30am - 1:00pm
Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology Malet Pl, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 6BT

1:30pm

TAG25 | Radical Archaeology: What is it? How do we do it? Why do we need it?
The delivery of the archaeological experience to society, while well-intentioned, remains largely and fundamentally undemocratic: community projects organised on a top-down basis; professional and academic archaeologists as self-imposed historical gatekeepers; and dominant historical narratives preserved by professionals and delivered to the public, with limited
opportunity for personal engagement or interpretation (including ongoing inaccessibility of conferences to laypeople)! In the current climate of religious and political extremism, refugee crises, media manipulation, and climate collapse, living our lives on a historically informed basis is more important than ever.

We propose that in order for archaeology to truly serve the interests and expectations of communities, its practice should embrace a more politically-aware approach, as offered by a more radical archaeology. The definition of radical is “…of change or action: going to the root or origin; touching upon or affecting what is fundamental; thorough, far-reaching; revolutionary” (OED). This house proposes revisiting and revitalising the concept of radical archaeology, as previously outlined by the Radical Archaeology Forum, Archaeologists Against War and Archaeologists for Global Justice. Can we construct a truly democratic and participatory practice, while excluding discriminatory views? Does the layperson have every right to interpret the past subjectively, or should we impose limits?

We propose a panel discussion with speakers providing different viewpoints, and discussion from the floor. This panel intends to spark debate about the political state of archaeology today and its implications, and how we might revolutionise archaeological practice to prevent stagnation and promote socio-intellectual equality.

Organisers: Rebecca Hearne; University of Sheffield • Umberto Albarella; University of Sheffield

13:30 | Umberto Albarella, University of Sheffield | Why radical archaeology

13:45 | Rebecca Hearne, University of Sheffield | The Archaeological Imagination: radical archaeology and mental health recovery

14:00 | Alexander Aston, School of Archaeology, University of Oxford | Against the Curio Cabinet and towards a Storied Past

14:15 | Caitlin Kitchener, University of York | Martyrs for the Cause: A radical archaeology built on historical radicalism

14:30 | Brian Broadrose, UMass Dartmouth |

14:45 | Umberto Albarella, University of Sheffield; Rebecca Hearne, University of Sheffield | Free-flowing general discussion chaired by session organisers

15:10 | - | BREAK

15:40 | Umberto Albarella, University of Sheffield; Rebecca Hearne, University of Sheffield | Free-flowing general discussion chaired by session organisers

17:00 | - | END

Speakers
UA

Umberto Albarella

University of Sheffield
RH

Rebecca Hearne

University of Sheffield
AA

Alexander Aston

School of Archaeology, University of Oxford
CK

Caitlin Kitchener

University of York
BB

Brian Broadrose

UMass Dartmouth


Monday December 16, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 777/80 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

1:30pm

TAG03 | Archaeology, ancestry, and human genomics – a panel debate
The incorporation of ancient DNA into the archaeological toolkit has been widely hailed as a “scientific revolution” in the understanding of the human past. It is also widely recognised that applying genomics to prehistory involves complexities at every level of interpretation, and has on many occasions become the basis for questionable (and often widely publicised) claims about past cultural identities. This panel creates a space where issues of method and theory can be openly debated by archaeologists, geneticists, and others interested in questions of population history and ancestry, including how scientific findings are presented and narrated to the wider public. A particular focus will be on the relationship between population histories inferred from genetic data and groupings based on material culture, especially the prehistoric entities once referred to as ‘culture areas,’ ‘archaeological horizons’ or ‘interaction spheres’. Should the archaeological discourse of biological relatedness, through genomics, present its findings in relation to these much older cultural classifications (also potentially breathing new life into their established narratives of population groupings and dispersals)? Or does the intersection between archaeology and human genomics require entirely new ways of conceptualising the relationship between demographic and cultural histories?

Organisers: David Wengrow; UCL • Brenna Hassett; UCL • Pontus Skoglund; Francis Crick Institute • Selina Brace; Natural History Museum

13:30 | Martin Furholt, University of Oslo; Alexandra Ion, Institute of Anthropology 'Francisc I.Rainer' of the Romanian Academy; Natasha Reynolds, University of Bordeaux; Rachel Pope, British Women Archaeologists (BWA) and University of Liverpool; Kenny Brophy, University of Glasgow; Pontus Skoglund, Francis Crick Institute; Tom Booth, Francis Crick Institute; Mark Thomas, UCL; Ian Barnes, Natural History Museum; Selina Brace, Natural History Museum; Susanne Hakenbeck, Dept. of Archaeology, University of Cambridge | Panel

15:00 | - | BREAK

15:30 | Martin Furholt, University of Oslo; Alexandra Ion, Institute of Anthropology 'Francisc I.Rainer' of the Romanian Academy; Natasha Reynolds, University of Bordeaux; Rachel Pope, British Women Archaeologists (BWA) and University of Liverpool; Kenny Brophy, University of Glasgow; Pontus Skoglund, Francis Crick Institute; Tom Booth, Francis Crick Institute; Mark Thomas, UCL; Ian Barnes, Natural History Museum; Selina Brace, Natural History Museum; Susanne Hakenbeck, Dept. of Archaeology, University of Cambridge | ...Continued

17:00 | - | END

Speakers
MF

Martin Furholt

University of Oslo
AI

Alexandra Ion

Institute of Anthropology 'Francisc I.Rainer' of the Romanian Academy
NR

Natasha Reynolds

University of Bordeaux
RP

Rachel Pope

British Women Archaeologists (BWA) and University of Liverpool
KB

Kenny Brophy

University of Glasgow
PS

Pontus Skoglund

Francis Crick Institute
TB

Tom Booth

Francis Crick Institute
IB

Ian Barnes

Natural History Museum
SB

Selina Brace

Natural History Museum
SH

Susanne Hakenbeck

Dept. of Archaeology, University of Cambridge


Monday December 16, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 802/4 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

1:30pm

TAG04 | New feminisms? Radical post-humanist archaeologies
We live in volatile political times: white supremacy is rising, xenophobic attitudes shape politics, homophobic and transphobic discrimination continues and the pervasive and powerful nature of the patriarchy runs through all of these. Intersectional feminist, queer, and post-colonial discourses in broader society have resurged in this context.In archaeology essential work on sexual harassment has stimulated a powerful new wave of intersectional feminist discourse demanding changes in our practice. Yet our theory has seen less radical change. This is ironic because non-anthropocentric approaches have been gaining traction in archaeology, and many arise from feminist thinking. Feminist theorists such as Barad, Bennett, Braidotti, Grosz, and Harraway have drawn attention to how the majority of the population have been excluded from the category ‘human’ by humanism and argue for a radical re-understanding of the human and the vibrant worlds they are a part of. The humans that emerge are deeply relational, entangled with diverse other-than-humans, and always historical. These approaches are intersectional and feminist, yet our engagement with them often overlooks their potential to radically reframe marginalized voices both past and present.We call for papers which challenge this by engaging explicitly with the potential of post-anthropocentric, new materialist and post-humanist approaches to make bold and radical changes to our ontologies and thus our conceptualisation of marginalised (human and non-human) identities. Feminism was a crucial driver of post-processualism and engaging explicitly with developments in new materialist and post-humanist feminisms is of equal importance in realising the promise of the ontological turn.

Organisers: Rachel Crellin; University of Leicester • Hannah Cobb; University of Manchester

13:30 | Hannah Cobb, University of Manchester; Rachel Crellin, University of Leicester | Session introduction

13:35 | Penny Bickle, University of York | New approaches to difference? Celebrating and experiencing ambiguous bodies in the European Neolithic

13:52 | Yvonne O'Dell, University of Leicester | ‘Nobody knows what a [feminist] body can do’: difference, immanence and becoming

14:09 | Rachel Crellin, University of Leicester | A post-humanist, feminist approach to power

14:26 | Claudia Chang, Independent Scholar | “Nomadic subjects” and Eurasian Iron Age studies of households and feasting

14:43 | Session organisers | Discussion

14:53 | - | BREAK

15:23 | Marianne Hem Eriksen, Department of Archaeology, University of Oslo | Grievability, households, and violence in the Iron and Viking Ages

15:40 | Ben Jervis, Cardiff University | Misogyny, Patriarchy and Female Labour in the Medieval Household

15:57 | Craig N. Cipolla, Royal Ontario Museum/University of Toronto; James Quinn, Mohegan Tribal Historic Preservation Office | Situating posthuman feminisms in collaborative Indigenous archaeology

16:14 | Hannah Cobb, University of Manchester | Becoming Archaeologist

16:31 | Session organisers | Discussion

17:00 | - | END

Speakers
HC

Hannah Cobb

University of Manchester
RC

Rachel Crellin

University of Leicester
PB

Penny Bickle

University of York
YO

Yvonne O'Dell

University of Leicester
CC

Claudia Chang

Independent Scholar
MH

Marianne Hem Eriksen

Department of Archaeology, University of Oslo
BJ

Ben Jervis

Cardiff University
CN

Craig N. Cipolla

Royal Ontario Museum/University of Toronto
JQ

James Quinn

Mohegan Tribal Historic Preservation Office


Monday December 16, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 826 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

1:30pm

TAG21 | Challenging narratives and legacies in the archaeology and heritage of the Middle East and North Africa
The focus of the session is on the legacy and practice of archaeology and heritage in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Archaeology and heritage in the region are often seen as heavily influenced by old practices and theories of early excavators. The session seeks to consider and challenge old or traditional narratives of archaeological research in the region. As well as how past research is used in current interpretations and the influence of past practices on knowledge production. The papers and discussion will consider the role of archaeology and heritage on past or current political situations like colonialism and current uprisings. This includes: the influence of past practices or narratives on archaeology and heritage today. The use of archives and archival research in modern archaeological or heritage practices. New or ‘non-traditional’ methods in heritage and archaeology for a better understanding of archaeological context or engagement with local people and the public; the influence of colonialism and decolonisation in the interpretation of archaeology in the region. This could include from a cultural perspective but also the influence of professional privilege and control of archaeological information. The portrayal of the past in museums and in the media (e.g. documentaries, social media, field-work websites...) to the public/non-subject specialists and how this affects both public perception and professional practices in archaeology and heritage.

Organisers: Ikram Ghabriel; UCL • Chloë Ward; UCL

13:30 | Session organisers | Introduction

13:35 | Brian Boyd, Columbia University | In the context of settler colonialism, what counts as archaeological/historical archive?

13:55 | Chloe Emmott, PhD candidate, University of Greenwich | The influence of the Classical World and Imperialism on Archaeology in Palestine

14:15 | Nourhan Nassar MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge | An Egyptian counter-narrative to nineteenth century British Egyptology: A reading in the Khitat Ali Mubarak

14:35 | Nora Shalaby, Humboldt University, Berlin | The Abydos Temple Paper Archive Project: Exploring Egyptian Histories from early Egyptology

14:55 | Session organisers | Discussion

15:10 | - | BREAK

15:40 | Bonnie Effros, University of Liverpool, Department of History | Reviving Carthage’s Martyrs: Archaeology, Memory, and Catholic Devotion in the French Protectorate of Tunisia

16:00 | Kelley Tackett, Brown University, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World | Half as old as time: archaeology and the constructed past in Petra Archaeological Park

16:20 | Eman Shokry Hesham, Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg | “Ancient Thebes” and Modern Luxor: the history of the management of a World Heritage Site

16:40 | Session organisers | Discussion

17:00 | - | END

Speakers
BE

Bonnie Effros

University of Liverpool, Department of History
KT

Kelley Tackett

Brown University, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
ES

Eman Shokry Hesham

Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg
BB

Brian Boyd

Columbia University
CE

Chloe Emmott: PhD candidate

University of Greenwich
NS

Nora Shalaby

Humboldt University, Berlin


Monday December 16, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Room W3.06 (Level 3) 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

1:30pm

TAG31 | Archaeology and Heritage in Populist Nationalist Constructions, Projections, and Justifications of Otherness
Populist nationalism divides an inside 'us' from an outside 'them', both vertically, separating 'the people' from 'the elite', and horizontally, marking a dichotomy between a perceived ‘native’ in-group and ‘foreign’ others. People, ideas, objects, practices and places from prehistoric and historic times are mobilised as part of simple myths that are aimed at legitimising narratives of national ancestry, development, or destiny (Coakley 2004). Concurrently, archaeological knowledge can be – and has been – deployed to deconstruct projected otherness, sometimes utilising similar schemes of narrative construction.This session invites papers that examine processes of appropriation of the past to generate, express or oppose populist nationalist ideologies. It will highlight the underlying dynamics through which archaeological knowledge enters political discourse, and will particularly reflect on the kinds of past that are drawn upon, and the myths they are moulded into. It is hoped that, by developing a better understanding of how the past, interpreted through archaeological approaches, is utilised politically, we can reflect on how archaeologists contribute or respond to situations where the past is weaponized. The session aims to encourage comparative and interdisciplinary discussion, drawing on case studies that focus on different periods and a range of geographical contexts. Papers concentrating on tangible and intangible heritage, and those addressing how representations of archaeology in pop-culture may contribute to the development of specific political discourses are particularly encouraged.

Organisers: Barbora Žiačková; University of Oxford • Ole F. Nordland; UCL • Chiara Bonacchi; University of Sterling

13:30 | Chiara Bonacchi, University of Sterling; Barbora Žiačková, University of Oxford; Ole F. Nordland, UCL | Intro

13:40 | Daniel Robert Hansen, University of Chicago | Archaeology as Dialogue: Hearing the many voices of the archaeology of ethnicity

13:55 | Frederika Tevebring, Warburg Institute | The Myth of the Matriarchy: Othering Scholarship

14:10 | Session organisers | Discussion

14:15 | David Farrell-Banks, Newcastle University | 1683 & The Identitarian Movement: Uses of the Siege of Vienna in right wing populist discourse

14:30 | Herdis Hølleland, Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research; Elisabeth Niklasson, Stanford University | Visions of division: far right imageries of Scandinavian pasts and presents

14:45 | Session organisers | Discussion

14:55 | Theodor Lothe Bruun, Independent Researcher | The Gustav Vasa statue

15:10 | Ida Lunde Jørgensen, Copenhagen Business School | Meet the Vikings: blending archaeological artefacts and a designer’s visualizations in uncertain
times

15:25 | Session organisers | Discussion

15:30 | - | BREAK

16:00 | Alasdair Chi, Nanyang Technological University | A Critical Examination of Historical Narratives and Founding Myths of Precolonial Singapore or: Will the Real Sang Nila Utama Please Stand Up?

16:15 | Emily Hanscam, Durham University | ‘We didn’t start the fire’: exploring reactions to heritage at risk

16:30 | Chiara Bonacchi, University of Sterling; Barbora Žiačková, University of Oxford; Ole F. Nordland, UCL | Discussion

17:00 | - | END

Speakers
CB

Chiara Bonacchi

University of Sterling
BZ

Barbora Žiačková

University of Oxford
DR

Daniel Robert Hansen

University of Chicago
FT

Frederika Tevebring

Warburg Institute
DF

David Farrell-Banks

Newcastle University
HH

Herdis Hølleland

Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research
EN

Elisabeth Niklasson

Stanford University
TL

Theodor Lothe Bruun

Independent Researcher
IL

Ida Lunde Jørgensen

Copenhagen Business School
AC

Alasdair Chi

Nanyang Technological University
EH

Emily Hanscam

Durham University


Monday December 16, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Room W3.05 (Level 3) 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

1:30pm

TAG44 | Power Play: Archaeology and Games
The field of archaeogaming, the study of the intersection between archaeology and video games, has been gaining increased academic recognition. Some of the main research strands have included examinations of the ethics of looting in video games and establishing video games as archaeological sites. This session aims to build on this existing research, whilst also inviting new perspectives, specifically examining how power dynamics are produced or reproduced in games from an archaeological point of view.

Whilst archaeogaming studies have tended to focus on digital games, this session is open to submissions focusing on any kind of game, from prehistoric gaming pieces to 19th century boardgames to upcoming video game releases. We are open to considering a wide range of interpretations of this core theme. Some suggested topics, which are by no means exhaustive, include:

·         Colonialism and historical/archaeological games
·         Power dynamics in games affected by race/gender/sexuality/age/disability
·         Accessibility and games
·         Working conditions in games development and archaeology

We particularly encourage submissions from individuals outside of the academy, from other disciplines, individuals who have not presented at a conference before and those at undergraduate level. If you would like to submit but are concerned about conference fees, please do get in touch as we are passionate about making this session as accessible as possible.  There will also be a digital stream of the session on Twitter for those who cannot present in person.

As stated in the abstract, we are very keen to have a digital stream for this session running alongside it (e.g. Twitter papers) to allow for greater accessibility. If you have any questions about our proposed session please do not hesitate to get in touch.

Organisers: Florence Smith Nicholls; Independent Scholar • Sara Stewart; Independent Researcher

13:30 | Timon Dawid du Toit, University of Pretoria | A Heritage-Focused Video Game on uKhahlamba Drakensberg Traditions

13:50 | Amanda Gomes, Center for Ainu and Indigenous Studies, Hokkaido University | Booms and Bombs- Situating Breath of the Wild within the “Jomon Boom” trend

14:10 | Ricardo Shankland, Independent Scholar | How the Archaeology of Amazons helped Women in to War Games

14:30 | Xavier Rubio-Campillo, University of Edinburgh, School of History, Classics and Archaeology / Murphy’s Toast Games | Education or fun? Creating video games to promote archaeological thinking

14:50 | Angus Mol, VALUE Foundation | A Game of Stones: Playing with Tim Ingold’s Materials against Materiality

15:10 | - | BREAK

15:40 | Benjamin Hanussek, University of Warsaw | (Digital) Game Archaeologies: Going Digital to understand Material/Going Material to understand Digital

16:00 | Hanna Marie Pageau, University of Cardiff | A Tale of Careers : Archaeogaming and Accessibility

16:20 | Aris Politopoulos, Leiden University; Angus Mol, VALUE Foundation | Dangerously Fun: Politics, play, past, and the phenomenon of archaeogaming

16:40 | Florence Smith Nicholls, Independent Scholar | Working is Broken: Labour Conditions in Commercial Archaeology and Video Game Development

17:00 | - | END

Speakers
TD

Timon Dawid du Toit

University of Pretoria
AG

Amanda Gomes

Center for Ainu and Indigenous Studies, Hokkaido University
RS

Ricardo Shankland

Independent Scholar
XR

Xavier Rubio-Campillo

University of Edinburgh/ Murphy’s Toast Games
AM

Angus Mol

VALUE Foundation
BH

Benjamin Hanussek

University of Warsaw
HM

Hanna Marie Pageau

University of Cardiff
AP

Aris Politopoulos

Leiden University
FS

Florence Smith Nicholls

Museum of London Archaeology
GK

Gaurav Kalyani

Independent Scholar
SS

Sara Stewart

Independent Researcher


Monday December 16, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 822 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

1:30pm

TAG52 | Archaeologies of Marginality
The study of marginalized groups and individuals is gaining increased attention in archaeological research. Archaeologies of Marginality will address past inequalities by looking at social stratification and growing social complexity in deep history, with a focus on the multidimensional facets of social exclusion and their intersectional aspects. In this session, we discuss the development of appropriate theoretical and methodological frameworks to investigate marginality in the past to promote marginality studies in archaeology. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

● dynamics of resistance and the agency of the socially excluded;
● violence and coercive power;
● poverty and marginality in relation to socio-economic status; warfare and war crimes, migration, forced labor and slavery
● disease and disability
● gender, personhood, age and the life course; marginality and social exclusion in relation to motherhood, pregnancy and childhood neglect;
● marginality in times of collapse, crisis and environmental stress;
● marginal landscapes, peripheral regions and ethnic marginality;
● material culture and technology between deprivation and elite consumption;
● anomalous burial rites, funerary deviancy and marginal burial;
● bioarcheology, ancient DNA analysis and science-based approaches to past marginality;
● marginality and social exclusion today; marginality in academia, epistemology; accessibility, inclusivity and diversity;
● Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) and the safeguarding of marginalized people's endangered cultural heritage.

Organisers: Elisa Perego; UCL • Andrew Reynolds; UCL • Andy Gardner; UCL

13:30 | Session organisers | Intro

13:40 | Anna Bloxam, UCL | Accessing marginal practices, peoples, and identities in prehistory

14:00 | Floor Huisman, Cambridge Archaeological Unit | Souls of sedge in a marginal marsh? The role and place of ‘fen slodgers’ and the former East Anglian Fens within the wider landscape

14:20 | Richard Kendall, University of Edinburgh | Scholars can’t be Choosers; Homelessness in Pre-Christian Rome

14:40 | Jake Weekes, Canterbury Archaeological Trust | The Empire of History

15:00 | Canek Huerta Martinez, UNAM, Mexico | “Vecindario Tlailotlacan: An Archaeology from the edges”

15:20 | - | BREAK

15:50 | Rosamund E. Fitzmaurice (Rosie), UCL | Ethnohistory and “Slavery”: to what extent can we use ethnohistory to understand indigenous dependency in Precolumbian central Mexico?

16:10 | Oscar Toro Bardeci, UCL | From bordering to marginalised. The process of incorporation of pehuenche groups to the chilean state in the 19th century

16:30 | Lan CoCo Shi, UCL | Marginalised intangible culture in Wanjian Village

16:50 | Session organisers | Discussion

17:00 | - | END


Monday December 16, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 784 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

1:30pm

TAG53 | Animals and humans: power, knowledge and agency
Human – animal relationships have often been viewed in terms of domination and exploitation, whilst more recently there has been an emphasis on commensality, intimacy and trust. Power and knowledge flow around such relationships, directed by the agency of both human and animal participants. In addition, knowledge of animals may shape human – human interactions, being used to empower or to marginalise animal specialists. Within mainstream archaeology, the significance of animals is largely confined to economy and domestication, and the power, knowledge and agency that revolve within and around animal-human interactions are essentially ignored.

This session will encourage discussion and debate on the dynamics of human-animal relationships, exploring ways in which animals themselves, together with those who interact with them have shaped human history. Animals have not ceased to be an important means for constructing human relationships; rather, human relationships have become so complex that it is frequently forgotten that animals, their agency and their exploitation may lie unrecognised at the very base of these constructs. Knowledge and power are clearly interwoven through these relationships. Themes to be explored may include (but are not limited to) theory and theoretical approaches to animals in human societies, animal-based cosmologies, cross-disciplinary perspectives and animal-related technologies.

Organisers: Andrew Reid; UCL • Joanna Lawrence; University of Cambridge • Mariana B. Muñoz-Rodríguez; University of York • Claire Ratican; University of Cambridge • Laerke Recht; University of Cambridge

13:30 | Joanna Lawrence, University of Cambridge | Introduction

13:35 | Jill Goulder, University College London | Donkeys - the secret agents

13:55 | Neil Erskine, University of Glasgow | Farm, Field, and Fauna. Socialisation in the agricultural hinterlands of the 3rd Millennium Jazira

14:15 | Lonneke Delpeut, Leiden University | The expression of human-horse relationships in ancient Egypt

14:35 | Claire Ratican, University of Cambridge | Animal and HumanBodies in Producing Viking Age Persons

14:55 | - | BREAK

15:25 | Erica Priestley, Independent researcher | Waste Not - A Re-examination of Neanderthal Hunting Strategies and their Relationships with Animals

15:45 | Erin Crowley, University of Minnesota | Commensal Feasts with Commensal Beasts

16:05 | Andrew Reid, UCL | Livestock, agency and the human career

16:25 | Joanna Lawrence, University of Cambridge; Andrew Reid, UCL; Claire Ratican, University of Cambridge; Laerke Recht, University of Cambridge | Discussion

17:00 | - | END

Speakers
JL

Joanna Lawrence

University of Cambridge
JG

Jill Goulder

University College London
NE

Neil Erskine

University of Glasgow
LD

Lonneke Delpeut

Leiden University
CR

Claire Ratican

University of Cambridge
EP

Erica Priestley

Independent researcher
EC

Erin Crowley

University of Minnesota
LR

Laerke Recht

University of Cambridge


Monday December 16, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 728 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

1:30pm

TAG54 | What have we done for the Romans?
This session seeks to explore how two groups of people, archaeologists and the public, conceive of the Roman past. Conserving and interpreting the archaeological remains of Roman Londinium and Britain is a series of choices. What gets uncovered, kept, conserved, and published affects what stories we tell the public, and we also make choices about the content and intent of our stories. What influences the choices of the stories we tell? Even with the best intentions we may be influenced by current political events, social trends or technological drivers. But we are also interested in what and how the public knows about the Roman past. What motivates visitors to seek out sites, museums or information about the Roman past? What do they already know? What do they want to know? Should they get what they want or should we subvert and challenge their understanding? In this session we invite speakers to explore ontologies of the Roman past in London and Britain through presentation of archaeological sites, museum displays, publications, fiction and other media. We welcome speakers from the heritage, museum, and broadcasting worlds as well as from community, commercial and academic archaeology.

Organisers: Kim Biddulph, Project Manager; City of London Corporation • Howard Benge, Public Programmes Manager; City of London Corporation • Jackie Kiely, Senior Curator Prehistory and Roman; Museum of London • Jane Sidell; Historic England

13:30 | Howard Benge, Public Programmes Manager, City of London Corporation; Kim Biddulph, Project Manager, City of London Corporation | What have we done for the Romans?

13:50 | Caroline Lawrence, author, Independent Researcher | Travelling Bones and Leather Bikinis: How Archaeology Inspires Fiction

14:10 | Ruth Taylor, History Co-ordinator and Senior Teacher, University College School Junior Branch | Archaeology, the Romans and the National Curriculum: an archaeologist-turned-teacher’s perspective.

14:30 | Andrew Roberts, Properties Historian, English Heritage | My Roman Pantheon: Experiential Digital Interpretation at Chesters Roman Fort

14:50 | Antony Lee (PhD student), Department of Archaeology, Durham University | “Experiencing the gods: Lived Ancient Religion and the interpretation of Romano-British religion in museums”

15:10 | - | BREAK

15:40 | Jackie Keily, Senior Curator Prehistory and Roman, Museum of London | Curating Roman London

16:00 | Sophie Jackson, Museum of London Archaeology; Helen Chiles, London Mithraeum Bloomberg Space | Where archaeology meets technology

16:20 | Jane Sidell, Historic England | Preservation and presentation of Roman archaeology in London.

16:40 | Hedley Swain, Area Director South East., Arts Council England | What have we done to the Romans?


17:00 | - | END


Monday December 16, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Clarke Hall (Level 3) 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

1:30pm

TAG55 | Archaeology and Wellbeing – digging into your mind, body, and soul, and what it can mean for your project, class or business
The world, workplace, and media are more interested in wellbeing than ever before. Little wonder when wellbeing is most simply defined as a state of being comfortable, healthy or happy. Which is something we should all agree belongs in a much-loved, people-friendly discipline like archaeology? But wellbeing is a term that is all to often met with caution and misunderstanding, that can be seen as an unfathomable and unrealistic ambition, when faced with the realities of bottom lines, deadlines, and working with people.

This panel session will explore a range of ways wellbeing can support archaeology (its projects and its people), including ways it already does. It will also look at ways archaeology can support the delivery of wellbeing to the world at large. It will encourage the audience to think about what wellbeing means to them, and what Is reasonably achievable within the realms of what they are already doing, and what hey want to achieve. It will also consider what shouldn’t be attempted, because even if we're going to provide improved wellbeing for all, it doesn’t mean everyone needs to be doing everything to achieve this, especially in the face off clear archaeological aims.

Organisers: Mark Evans, Chief Executive / Co-founder; Waterloo Uncovered

13:30 | Session organisers | Introduction

13:40 | Lisa Dunthorne, Counsellor / Occupational therapist, previously DMRC Headley Court | What is wellbeing? How archaeology and other such activities can positively affect wellbeing and wider mental health.

14:00 | Mark Evans, Chief Executive / Co-founder, Waterloo Uncovered | Waterloo Uncovered: An Archaeology project designed with wellbeing in mind.

14:20 | Cornelius Barton, Partner and Commercial Archaeologist, L–P: Archaeology | Wellbeing and commercial archaeology.

14:40 | Gaille Mackinnon, Lead Forensic Anthropologist and Archaeologist, Alecto Forensics | The impact of archaeology on mental health and wellbeing on people, and how to manage it.

15:00 | - | BREAK

15:30 | Dr. Karina Croucher, Senior Lecturer in Archaeology, University of Bradford | Using funerary archaeology to support wellbeing and build resilience: Continuing Bonds; Dying to Talk and BReaTHe (Building Resilience Through Heritage)

15:50 | Charlotte Frearson, Student Recruitment & Experience Officer/Fieldwork & Placement Coordinator/Careers Tutor (with her therapy dog Indy), UCL Institute of Archaeology | TAG’s take on wellbeing. UCL Institute of Archaeology Student and Staff wellbeing in the university environment.

16:10 | Session organisers | Discussion

17:00 | - | END


Monday December 16, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 739 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

1:30pm

TAG26 | Debating power and knowledge in archaeological curricula: A student-staff joint forum
Although demands to decolonise archaeological education are longstanding, recent years have seen a groundswell of student-led activist movements critiquing the nature of academic power and the power of the university curriculum. Calls of ‘why is my curriculum white?’ and ‘Rhodes Must Fall’ have spurred debate over legacies of institutional racism, equality of access to educational and career opportunities, and representation and acknowledgement of diverse student experiences, among other themes. These calls resonate with wider conversations within archaeology around sexual harassment in the field, the office, conference venue or classroom, gender and racial gaps in salary and educational attainment, and the expectations of collaborative knowledge production across geographical and cultural contexts.

Building on dialogues that have emerged out of this year’s SAAs and TRAC, in this session, students and staff will jointly explore the nature of power and knowledge at this nexus of pedagogy and archaeological practice. Taking the form of a round table moderated by one student and one faculty member, the session encourages discussion of topics including (but not limited to) curriculum content; access to and inclusion within field-based teaching; incorporating student perspectives in teaching strategies; educational media and teaching delivery; and practices of establishing and critiquing expertise in the classroom.

Submissions for participation in this session should come from faculty and students, and should take the form of 1) a statement of interest (max 250 words) in participating in the session; and 2) a set of 2-5 questions to pose to the group, which will form the basis of group discussion with a view to developing a set of action points. Session participants will be expected to adhere to TAG@UCL-IoA’s code of conduct, and should treat this foremost as a collaborative forum.

Organisers: Rachel King; UCL Institute of Archaeology • Alice Stevenson; UCL

13:30 | Rachel King, UCL Institute of Archaeology; Alice Stevenson, UCL | Debating power and knowledge in archaeological curricula: A student-staff joint forum

15:00 | - | BREAK

15:30 | Rachel King, UCL Institute of Archaeology; Alice Stevenson, UCL | ...Continued

17:00 | - | END

Speakers
RK

Rachel King

UCL Institute of Archaeology


Monday December 16, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 828 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

5:30pm

Plenary Panel: What is the past good for in the world of 2020?
Plenary panel discussion chaired by Dr. Andrew Gardner

Speakers
LN

Liv Nilsson Stutz

Linnaeus University, Sweden
AO

Arike Oke

Managing Director, Black Cultural Archives, UK
JM

Janet Miller

Chief Executive Officer, MoLA (Museum of London Archaeology), UK


Monday December 16, 2019 5:30pm - 7:15pm
Logan Hall UCL Institute of Education (IOE), 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL
 
Tuesday, December 17
 

9:00am

British Museum: Troy myth and reality exhibition — Special Access
Between 9am and 10am on Tuesday, TAG delegates are permitted free access to the British Museum's fantastic new Troy exhibition, Troy myth and reality. Once inside the exhibition you may stay past 10am. Delegates must present their TAG name badges to museum staff to gain entry. There will be a short welcome for TAG delegates at 9:05am.

The legend of Troy has endured for more than 3,000 years. The story of a great city, plunged into a 10-year war over the abduction of the most beautiful woman in the world, is irresistibly dramatic and tragic. This allure has sent adventurers and archaeologists in quest of the lost city, which is now widely believed to have existed.

More info on the exhibition here


Tuesday December 17, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am
The British Museum Great Russell St, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 3DG

9:30am

Guided walking tour of Londinium **BOOKING REQUIRED**
** Please note you must book in advance using Eventbrite to join this walking tour **

Walk through Londinium from the south-east corner of the City on the riverside through to the banks of the Walbrook and then to the northwestern corner near the late first century fort in one morning. Starting on Lower Thames Street we will explore three preserved archaeological sites in London – Billingsgate Roman House and Baths, London Mithraeum Bloomberg Space and London’s Roman Amphitheatre at Guildhall. The aim is to have a walking symposium comparing the interpretation and presentation of evidence, the emotional response to and future direction of each site, as well as thinking about bits of Londinium that the public might and might not know about and what to do about them, if anything. We will finish in the Roman gallery at the Museum of London, soon to be moved and reconfigured in its new space at Smithfield. The story of Londinium will be told in new ways, join us to explore what they could be.

Itinerary
Please meet around the entrance to Tower Hill underground  station for 9.30am
Tower Hill & Bathhouse 9.30am
Billingsgate 9.45am
Mithraeum 10.30am
Amphitheatre 11.15am
Museum of London 12.00pm
Return to conference building for lunch 1pm

Additional information
There are toilets at each venue and they all have lift access except the bathhouse.
Bathhouse only has step access: there are three flights of steps with 3, 9 and 2 steps and a rail on the left-hand side when descending the stairs.
Generally moving around the City should be accessible as there are dropped kerbs at crossings and route avoids steps.




Tuesday December 17, 2019 9:30am - 11:30am

9:30am

TAG34 | Playing with the past, practising for the future : A workshop for experimental community archaeology
Community archaeology isn’t, and never should be, a box ticking exercise, a bolt-on to existing projects. It’s about keeping archaeology in the public psyche, inspiring the next generation of curious minds, keeping heritage and history relevant whilst acknowledging its inherently political nature. It’s about giving all of our fieldwork and research a relatable element, a touchstone to current community life that anchors it to ideas of belonging, identity, self, and cultural heritage. Community archaeology is as much about the future as it is the past – it ensures a future for heritage and for archaeological services. As budgets get tighter and funding gets scarcer, we need the public. The public, in turn need us – archaeology and heritage can provide opportunities for communities to form thriving hubs of culture, arts, and collaboration in the face of cuts to services and facilities. Beyond that, research is emerging into health and wellbeing outcomes of being involved in archaeology - tangible, quantifiable benefits that need strong further research and evaluation.We can provide a space for wellbeing to flourish, curiosity to be sparked, the incredible research and hard work of all archaeologists to be enjoyed and engaged with by a diverse audience. This session invites anyone working, volunteering, or researching community archaeology, public heritage, museums outreach and related fields. The format is of a workshop. We invite speakers to bring short activities - creative, playful, experimental - that the workshop participants can undertake and evaluate. We encourage submissions from individuals at any stage in their career.

Organisers: Penelope Foreman; Clwyd Powys Archaeological Trust • Penelope Foreman; Enabled Archaeology • Hanna Marie Pageau; University of Cardiff • Lara Band; MOLA • William Rathouse; MOLA • Gavin MacGregor; University of Glasgow

9:30 | Penelope Foreman, Clwyd Powys Archaeological Trust; Penelope Foreman, Enabled Archaeology | What is Commuity Archaeology for?

9:40 | Poppy Hodkinson, Cardiff University | STEM and Archaeology in UK Primary Schools

10:00 | Aaron Clarke, LP Archaeology | Playful People – Actual Artefacts

10:20 | Session organisers | Open Play!

11:20 | - | BREAK

11:50 | Claire Walton, Butser Ancient Farm | Butser Ancient Farm and Wessex Archaeology: Engaging communities through experimental archaeology.

12:10 | William Rathouse, MOLA | Archaeology for Mental Health and Well-Being: Two Models

12:30 | Penelope Foreman, Clwyd Powys Archaeological Trust; Penelope Foreman, Enabled Archaeology | Discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
PF

Penelope Foreman

Clwyd Powys Archaeological Trust
PH

Poppy Hodkinson

Cardiff University
AC

Aaron Clarke

LP Archaeology
CW

Claire Walton

Butser Ancient Farm
HM

Hanna Marie Pageau

University of Cardiff
GM

Gavin MacGregor

University of Glasgow


Tuesday December 17, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 728 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG45 | The Decolonisation of Archaeology and Archaeological Collections within museums
The work we undertake as archaeologists and curators of archaeological collections has the potential to be of great social value. Archaeology can have a positive effect on individual and collective wellbeing, contributing to the construction of identity, social connectivity, a sense of belonging and collective empowerment. However, these wellbeing effects vary between demographic groups. Up until the mid-20th century, Archaeology played an important role in the justification of colonial conquest by state and religious actors, the enactment of violent control, and the appropriation of the past of other countries. Through discourse of civilization and origins, Archaeology was used in the construction of European identity and of superiority. Colonial ideas continue to persist within academia (content and pedagogy), within the wider profession, and in museum practices. They are used to justify archaeological projects abroad, and they influence research frameworks and project designs in the UK. Cobb’s Digging Diversity research (2012; 2015) highlights the lack diversity within academia and the profession. As such, diverse perspectives and interpretations of archaeological evidence are excluded, and there is a distinct lack of representation within the stories we tell publicly.This session will discuss and explore: how the histories of colonialism and empire are reflected in archaeology, academia, archaeological practice, and museum collections and archives; diverse perspectives and re/interpretations of archaeological evidence; new approaches and examples of good practice.

References:
Cobb, H. L. 2012. ‘Digging diversity? A preliminary examination of disciplinary diversity in UK archaeology’, Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory.
Cobb, H. L. 2015. ‘A diverse profession? Challenging inequalities and diversifying involvement in British archaeology’, in P. Everill and P. Irving (eds.) Rescue Archaeology: Foundations for the Future, 226-245. Hereford: RESCUE.

Organisers: Benjamina Dadzie; Independent Researcher • Laura Hampden; Museum Detox • Laura Hampden; Historic England, Museum Detox, CIfA Equality and Diversity Group

9:30 | Laura Hampden, Museum Detox; Laura Hampden, Historic England, Museum Detox, CIfA Equality and Diversity Group | Introduction

9:35 | Louise Fowler, MOLA | Where does archaeology take place?

9:55 | Cathie Draycott, Durham University | Investigating Intersections of Race and Public Perceptions of Archaeology: a pilot survey run in Bermuda, 2019

10:15 | Gert Huskens, Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) and Ghent University | A ‘Belgian compromise’ of Science and Empire along the Nile

10:35 | Zena Kamash, Royal Holloway University; Cathie Draycott, Durham University; Niall Finneran, University of Winchester; Christina Welch, University of Winchester | Panel

11:05 | Dan Hicks, University of Oxford | Seeing the Pace of Violence in Theoretical Archaeology

11:25 | - | BREAK

11:55 | Elizabeth Marlowe, Colgate University | How to Say Nothing: A Case Study of the Museum Labels on Some Looted Bronzes

12:10 | Danika Parikh, University of Cambridge | From accession to access: decolonising archaeological collections through critical tours and audience engagement

12:25 | Subhadra Das, UCL & Museum Detox Member; Korantema Anyimadu, Arts Emergency Museum Detox Member; Jenny Williams, Take the Space; Ebony Francis, Diary of a Black Tree | Panel Discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
LH

Laura Hampden

Museum Detox
CD

Cathie Draycott

Durham University
GH

Gert Huskens

Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) and Ghent University
ZK

Zena Kamash

Royal Holloway University
NF

Niall Finneran

University of Winchester
CW

Christina Welch

University of Winchester
EM

Elizabeth Marlowe

Colgate University
DP

Danika Parikh

University of Cambridge
SD

Subhadra Das

UCL & Museum Detox Member
KA

Korantema Anyimadu

Arts Emergency Museum Detox Member
JW

Jenny Williams

Take the Space
EF

Ebony Francis

Diary of a Black Tree
BD

Benjamina Dadzie

Independent Researcher


Tuesday December 17, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 826 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG09 | Archaeological Activists and the Untold Histories of Archaeology
Our text books tell the orthodox story of how archaeology, as a discipline and a profession, has unfolded. Mostly constructed from the perspectives of straight white men, we hear how they moved through the theoretical paradigms, developing theories and methods which have become standardised and enshrined in our contemporary practices and heritage organisations. In between those grand themes however, unrecorded movements, initiatives and individuals did their own things in an effort to make a difference. How representative, therefore, are the ‘official’ accounts of what has happened? For some time, the feminist critique has been particularly strong in illustrating women who have “trowelblazed” (Cf. https://trowelblazers.com/) their way through the profession, and feminism has made real impacts in challenging persisting standard narratives. In the 1980s Archaeologists for Peace, together with Archaeologists Communicate Transform, briefly emphasised the wider concerns of archaeologists, attempting to promote the social investment archaeology makes. Before them, RESCUE was formed as a pressure group which retains that focus today. What other such stories might there be, of people getting together, or acting on their own, to protest, pressurise, influence and change the progress of archaeology on its otherwise established, and establishment-led, course? How, through their actions, have relatively unknown figures tilted at the relationships of power and knowledge between the establishment and the rest of us? How many more untold stories can be rescued from the margins? In this session we invite papers that build upon this examination of the intertwining of theory and practice, to tell the radical untold histories of archaeology.

Organisers: Hannah Cobb; University of Manchester • Duncan Brown; Historic England

9:30 | Hannah Cobb, University of Manchester; Duncan Brown, Historic England | Session introduction

9:35 | Jude Plouviez, RESCUE; Robin Densem, RESCUE | Rescue - A Secret Society?

9:55 | Kate Geary, CIfA; Rob Lennox, CIfA | ‘The Establishment’ Strikes Back: What CIfA activists are doing and why you should care

10:15 | Duncan Brown, Historic England | Archaeologists Communicate Transform!

10:35 | Kevin Wooldridge, Independent | How a group of archaeologists, supported by their trade union, took on management and won the largest ever protective award made by a UK industrial tribunal…

10:55 | Session organisers | Discussion

11:10 | - | BREAK

11:40 | Iia Shuteleva, UFA, Russia; Nikolai Shcherbakov, UFA, Russia; Tatiana Leonova, UFA, Russia | The "power of non-violence" or "Gandhism" of Russian provincial archaeology.

12:00 | Andy Hoaen, Open University; Stephen Sherlock, Independent | NO FUTURE: FROM MSC schemes to Master of Science Courses

12:20 | Hannah Cobb, University of Manchester | Reflecting on Reflexivity

12:40 | Session organisers | Discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
HC

Hannah Cobb

University of Manchester
DB

Duncan Brown

Historic England
IS

Iia Shuteleva

UFA, Russia
TL

Tatiana Leonova

UFA, Russia
AH

Andy Hoaen

Open University
SS

Stephen Sherlock

Independent


Tuesday December 17, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 739 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG11 | Mythical past, dangerous present: Challenging nationalism’s relationships with archaeology and history
With the reawakening of mainstream nationalism and reestablishment of right-wing political hegemony throughout Europe and the Americas, the past is once again weaponized. Archaeological and historical narratives are being adapted to support and coalesce national identities, ethno-religious-geographic boundaries, and anti-immigration policies. These mythical pasts are also being used to justify ethnic violence, Islamophobia, and anti-Semitism – including, most recently, on 15th March 2019, the murder of 50 worshippers at a mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand. This session will examine how, where and why these mythical pasts are (re)created. It will discuss the leaky pipelines of our disciplinary public engagement. It will ask how historians and archaeologists, and other humanities scholars, can work together to challenge the misuse of archaeological and historical evidence, ancient DNA, archives, texts and images, by those involved in populist politics, the digital right and mainstream media. Through this session discussion, it is hoped that we can establish ways forward with which to engage with, and challenge, these populist narratives.

Organisers: Kenny Brophy; University of Glasgow • Mark Hobbs; University of East Anglia • Lorna Richardson; University of East Anglia

9:30 | Session organisers | Introduction

9:40 | Greg Judges, University of Leeds | Living pasts: emotions and heritage in the post-truth era

9:50 | Sarah May, Swansea University | Coffwich Drweryn, heritage of conflict and grassroots nationalism

10:00 | Bethany Hardcastle, Independent Researcher | Music, nationalism... and Vikings?

10:10 | Jonathan Last, Historic England | Dwelling in the landscape: a challenge to nationalist archaeology

10:20 | Megan Gooch, Historic Royal Palaces | Heritage, art and commemoration: a centenary without history

10:30 | Miles Russell, Bournemouth University | God’s Chosen People: dangerous narratives in Early Medieval ‘history’

10:40 | Lily Hawker-Yates, Canterbury Christ Church University | “A Part of England’s Story”

10:50 | Emily Hanscam, Durham University | The Romanian myths of origin and the postnational critique: challenging reactionary populism

11:00 | Perry Stewart, Glasgow School of Art | Cheddar Man and the Daily Mail: Representing ‘controversial’ archaeology in the British Press and reading digital public discourse

11:10 | Mark Hobbs, University of East Anglia | The assault on Holocaust memory and history: Holocaust denial and the Leuchter
Report

11:20 | - | BREAK

11:50 | Tom Booth, Francis Crick Institute | I said it once before but it bears repeating: heritage is not just about our ancestors

12:00 | Kenny Brophy, University of Glasgow; Lorna Richardson, University of East Anglia | Discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
GJ

Greg Judges

University of Leeds
SM

Sarah May

Swansea University
BH

Bethany Hardcastle

Independent Researcher
LH

Lily Hawker-Yates

Canterbury Christ Church University
EH

Emily Hanscam

Durham University
JL

Jonathan Last

Historic England
MG

Megan Gooch

Historic Royal Palaces
MR

Miles Russell

Bournemouth University
PS

Perry Stewart

Glasgow School of Art
MH

Mark Hobbs

University of East Anglia
TB

Tom Booth

Francis Crick Institute
KB

Kenny Brophy

University of Glasgow
LR

Lorna Richardson

University of East Anglia


Tuesday December 17, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 802/4 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG14 | Capacious Archaeologies
The subject of affect has gained academic traction in the last decade or so (Massumi 2002, Stewart 2007, Thrift 2008, Manning 2016), with several collections now being devoted to the topic (Gregg and Seigworth 2010; Clough 2007) and an on-line journal (http://capaciousjournal.com/past-issues/vol-1-no-1-2017/). The study of affect is multitudinous, however archaeological responses to the topic have tended to narrowly conceive affect in terms of the emotions or senses (e.g. Brady and Bradley 2016, Hamilakis 2013, Harris and Sørenson 2010). While these discussions are important, we argue that the study of affect has much more to offer archaeology.

The session aims to explore the potentials of discussing affect in the study of the past. Affect has been discussed in relation to encounters with archaeological art (Back Danielsson et. al. 2012, Jones and Cochrane 2018), and has also been discussed as a component of relational assemblages (Jervis 2019). Each of these approaches open up the possibility for a much wider analysis of affect. But can we explore the topic of affect beyond the study of archaeological art; how are other things affective? If we consider affects to be components of complex assemblages of people, things and other entities then affect also offers a powerful tool for exploring power in a post-human or multi-species scenario. To consider the capacities of assemblages of things is to simultaneously consider the power of things to affect.

In the exploratory spirit of affect studies, we are interested not only in applying affect theory to the study of archaeology, but also in exploring the capacity of archaeology to expand the dimensions and capabilities of affect theory.

Back Danielsson, I.-M., Fahlander, F. and Sjöstrand, Y. 2012 Encountering Imagery. Materialities, perceptions, relations. Stockholm: Stockholm university.
Brady, L. and Bradley, J.J. 2016 Who do you want to kill? Affectual and relational understandings at a sorcery rock art site in the southwest Gulf of Carpentaria, northern Australia, Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 22 (4), 884-901.
Hamilakis, Y. 2013 Archaeology and the senses: human experience, memory and affect. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Harris, O. and Sørenson, T. F. 2010 Rethinking emotion and material culture, Archaeological Dialogues 17 (2), 145-63.
Jervis, B. 2019 Assemblage Thought and Archaeology. London: Routledge.
Jones, A.M. and Cochrane, A. 2018 The Archaeology of Art. Materials, Practices, Affects. London: Routledge.
Manning, E. 2016 The minor gesture. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
Massumi, B. 2002 Parables of the Virtual. Movement, Affect, Sensation. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
Stewart, K. 2007 Ordinary Affects. Durham, NV: Duke University Press.
Thrift, N. 2008 Non-representational theory. Space, politics, affect. London: Routledge.

Organisers: Ing-Marie Back Danielsson; Uppsala University, Sweden • Andrew Meirion Jones; University of Southampton • Ben Jervis; Cardiff University

9:30 | Rachel Crellin, University of Leicester | Affect and power – what difference does a word make?

9:45 | Elizabeth Arwill Nordbladh, Göteborg University, Sweden | Affective understandings, affective practices. A short discussion.

10:00 | Julie Lund, Oslo University, Norway | Kerbing Relations. Affecting By Using Pasts

10:15 | Oliver Harris, University of Leicester | Affect and post-anthropocentric architecture

10:30 | Andrew Meirion Jones, University of Southampton; Louisa Minkin, University of the Arts, London, UK | ‘Concepts have teeth’: capacities and transfers in the digital modelling of Blackfoot material culture

10:45 | Session organisers | Discussion

11:00 | - | BREAK

11:30 | Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Uppsala University, Sweden | Affect as the last cry of objects and phenomena

11:45 | Yvonne O'Dell, University of Leicester | Affect worlds and Immanence: A Spinozan Archaeology

12:00 | Ben Jervis, Cardiff University | Ground Affect: Honestones and Emergent Capitalism in Medieval England

12:15 | Joakim Kjellberg, Uppsala University, Sweden | Moral and objects of affect in the medieval world

12:30 | Kristján Mímisson, University of Iceland, Iceland | The Affect of Relating. On thingly humans and humanly things

12:45 | Andrew Meirion Jones, University of Southampton; Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Uppsala University, Sweden; Ben Jervis, Cardiff University | Discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
RC

Rachel Crellin

University of Leicester
EA

Elizabeth Arwill Nordbladh

Göteborg University, Sweden
JL

Julie Lund

Oslo University, Norway
OH

Oliver Harris

University of Leicester
AM

Andrew Meirion Jones

University of Southampton
LM

Louisa Minkin

University of the Arts, London, UK
IB

Ing-Marie Back Danielsson

Uppsala University, Sweden
YO

Yvonne O'Dell

University of Leicester
BJ

Ben Jervis

Cardiff University
JK

Joakim Kjellberg

Uppsala University, Sweden
KM

Kristján Mímisson

University of Iceland, Iceland


Tuesday December 17, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 784 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG15 | archaeological architectures - architectural archaeologies
For three decades archaeologists have been thinking and writing about architecture in diverse and challenging ways: as action, through risk-taking activity, as dependent, in time, as atmosphere, through material culture, as landscape, on sensory terms. Slow architecture, animal architecture, quick architecture, messy architecture, living architecture - all of these are critiques of the discipline of Architecture’s knowledge of form. Architecture is now thinking and writing about archaeology on creative terms, but are archaeologists listening?This session is a celebration of the creative force of archaeological architectures and architectural archaeologies. Its focus is other ways of telling, writing, and drawing the built environment from the outside and through undisciplinary practices.

Organisers: Lesley McFadyen; Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck • Alessandro Zambelli; School of Architecture, University of Portsmouth

9:30 | Lesley McFadyen, Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck; Alessandro Zambelli, School of Architecture, University of Portsmouth | Introduction

9:35 | Jonathan Hill, Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL | A Monument to a Ruin

9:55 | Marianne Hem Eriksen, Department of Archaeology, University of Oslo | House-dreams of the Viking Age: Undisciplined explorations of architecture, personhood, and dreaming in the past

10:10 | Judit Ferencz, Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL | The Graphic Novel as an Interdisciplinary Conservation Method in Architectural Heritage: A Book of Hours for Robin Hood Gardens

10:25 | Rose Ferraby, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge | Traces and Void: Architectural spaces and the archaeological imagination

10:40 | Lesley McFadyen, Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck | Discussion

10:55 | - | BREAK

11:25 | Tanja Romankiewicz, School of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Edinburgh | Metamorphosing Architecture

11:40 | Kevin Kay, Department of Archaeology, University of Cambridge | How Buildings Learn, Depend, and Extend: Drawing out the politics of space-making

11:55 | Dominic Walker, Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL | The Orkney Island Re-Forestry Commission. A Monastic Building to Celebrate the Beginnings and Endings of Humanity

12:10 | Samantha Brummage, Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck | Architecture and Artefacts in the Colne Valley: Place attachment in prehistory

12:25 | Kate Franklin, Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London | Ambivalent Architectures: Infrastructure, hospitality and the power of care on the medieval Silk Road

12:40 | Alessandro Zambelli, School of Architecture, University of Portsmouth | Discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
LM

Lesley McFadyen

Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck
AZ

Alessandro Zambelli

School of Architecture, University of Portsmouth
JH

Jonathan Hill

Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL
MH

Marianne Hem Eriksen

Department of Archaeology, University of Oslo
JF

Judit Ferencz

Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL
RF

Rose Ferraby

Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge
TR

Tanja Romankiewicz

School of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
KK

Kevin Kay

Department of Archaeology, University of Cambridge
DW

Dominic Walker

Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL
SB

Samantha Brummage

Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck
KF

Kate Franklin

Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London


Tuesday December 17, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Clarke Hall (Level 3) 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG20 | Gender and power in developer-funded archaeology
This session will be a panel debate exploring gendered experiences in developer-funded archaeology in and outside the UK; a much relied upon sector for paid archaeology work that plays an important role in keeping archaeologists employed and furthering research in our field. Previous TAG sessions and research on feminist archaeology, including H. L. Cobb’s recent studies on gender and diversity in developer-funded archaeology (2012; 2015), have helped to shine a light on the issues surrounding gender in this industry. Gender is empowering but our experiences can still leave us feeling powerless. Women have enhanced and still enhance our understanding of the past, actively contributing as archaeologists in the field and in research for hundreds of years. Acknowledgment of women’s role in excavating the past has thankfully been a popular topic in recent years and is receiving the attention it deserves, but more work can still be done. There are numerous gender related issues, within our current industry, that deserve even more attention. These range from, but are not limited to: sexual misconduct; maternity; gender stereotyping; gender roles; promotion opportunities; gender pay-gap; gendered physical and mental health issues; child-care and many more. These issues can result in many women leaving the field altogether (Clancy et al, 2014). This session seeks to provide a platform to share experiences of gender and power in developer-funded archaeology from around the world in a safe space. In doing so, we hope to raise awareness, provide a support network and demonstrate the need for change.

References:
Cobb, H. L. 2012. ‘Digging diversity? A preliminary examination of disciplinary diversity in UK archaeology’, Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory.
Cobb, H. L. 2015. ‘A diverse profession? Challenging inequalities and diversifying involvement in British archaeology’, in P. Everill and P. Irving (eds.) Rescue Archaeology: Foundations for the Future, 226-245. Hereford: RESCUE.
Clancy, K. B. H; Nelson R. G; Rutherford J. N; Hinde, K. 2014. ‘Survey of Academic Field Experiences (SAFE): Trainees Report Harassment and Assault’, PLoS ONE 9 (7).

Organisers: Francesca Mazzilli; Cambridge Archaeological Unit • Leah Hewerdine; Royal Holloway

9:30 | Session organisers | Introduction

9:35 | Jenny Andrew, Prospect Union | A reformative, trade union approach to tackling sexual harassment

9:50 | Danielle Bradford, University of Cambridge / RESPECT (Women in Archaeology & Heritage) Group | "A Culture of Shame and Silence": Redistributing power in the field.

10:05 | Sadie Watson, MOLA | Personal, Political, Professional: Reflections on a gendered career in archaeology

10:20 | Sara Simões, Cambridge Archaeological Unit / STARQ- Sindicato dos Trabalhadores de Arqueologia (Portuguese Union for Archaeologists); Sara Brito, STARQ- Sindicato dos Trabalhadores de Arqueologia (Portuguese Union for Archaeologists) | Is my gender an issue? An analysis on the Portuguese developer-funded archaeology

10:35 | María Coto-Sarmiento, University of Barcelona; Maria Yubero-Gómez, Independient researcher; Ana Pastor, University of Barcelona; Apen Ruíz, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya; Lourdes López, Independent researcher; Lara Delgado, University of Granada; Jesús Martín, Independent researcher | Dusting off the sexual harassment in Spanish Archaeology

10:50 | Alessandro Garrisi, National Archaeologists Association, Italy; Oriana Cerbone, National Archaeologists Association, Italy; Marcella Giorgio, National Archaeologists Association, Italy; Cristiana La Serra, National Archaeologists Association, Italy | “Italian archaeology is female”: issues and future of a female profession.

11:05 | - | BREAK

11:35 | Session organisers | Discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
JA

Jenny Andrew

Prospect Union
DB

Danielle Bradford

University of Cambridge / RESPECT (Women in Archaeology & Heritage) Group
SS

Sara Simões

Cambridge Archaeological Unit / STARQ- Sindicato dos Trabalhadores de Arqueologia (Portuguese Union for Archaeologists)
SB

Sara Brito

STARQ- Sindicato dos Trabalhadores de Arqueologia (Portuguese Union for Archaeologists)
MY

Maria Yubero-Gómez

Independient researcher
AP

Ana Pastor

University of Barcelona
AR

Apen Ruíz

Universitat Oberta de Catalunya
LL

Lourdes López

Independent researcher
LD

Lara Delgado

University of Granada
JM

Jesús Martín

Independent researcher
AG

Alessandro Garrisi

National Archaeologists Association, Italy
OC

Oriana Cerbone

National Archaeologists Association, Italy
MG

Marcella Giorgio

National Archaeologists Association, Italy
CL

Cristiana La Serra

National Archaeologists Association, Italy
FM

Francesca Mazzilli

Cambridge Archaeological Unit
LH

Leah Hewerdine

Royal Holloway


Tuesday December 17, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 828 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG46 | Archaeology and heritage studies in, of, and after the Anthropocene
What does it mean to live in a self-proclaimed “age of humans”? And what is the role of archaeology and heritage studies in the current planetary “crisis” which this age is widely recognised as having heralded? Over the past decade, the “Anthropocene” has stimulated significant comment across archaeology and heritage studies, appearing in a number of different guises--as temporal marker, extinction crisis, human niche, climatological catastrophe, socio-cultural formation, economic and political critique, and posthumanist rallying cry to name but a few. But these debates and discussions have tended to happen in isolation from one another, limiting their usefulness and impeding broader discussion of the significance of the concept for archaeology and heritage studies more generally. The aim of this session is to facilitate interdisciplinary conversations across a broad range of scientific, artistic and humanistic approaches to the Anthropocene (and associated past, present and future environmental and climate related issues) to begin to explore the ways in which archaeology and heritage studies might reorganise themselves to address the new research agendas which such interdisciplinary approaches, and the broader recognition of these associated contemporary planetary crises, urgently demand.

(Please note: themes from this session are continued in the first part of the linked Session 47, Persistent Pasts: Engaging with Conflict Legacies in the Present, which contains a number of Anthropocene/Conflict related papers, and participants are encouraged to resume the discussions by joining that session following this one).

Organisers: Rodney Harrison; University College London

9:30 | Rodney Harrison, University College London | Session Introduction

9:35 | Elizabeth Graham, UCL; Lindsay Duncan, UCL; Dan Evans, Lancaster University | Is the Future just a load of Rubbish?

9:55 | Geneviève Godin, UiT the Arctic University of Norway | Monsters and the Anthropocene: Things in the Grey Zone

10:15 | Phil Stastney, MOLA | Scale-framing: an Anthropocene reading of peatland archaeological and palaeoenvironmental datasets

10:35 | Gabriele Oropallo, New York University in London | Stray Materials as Information in Flux

10:55 | - | BREAK

11:25 | Helen Chittock, AOC Archaeology Group | Towards an Archaeology of Repair

11:45 | Monika Stobiecka, University of Warsaw | The Anthropocene curiosities: prefiguring future archaeological artifacts

12:05 | Koji Mizoguchi, Kyushu University | Detecting the ‘signs’, or how we can conduct archaeologies in a responsible manner for contemporary society

12:25 | Rodney Harrison, University College London | Discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
RH

Rodney Harrison

Professor of Heritage Studies, University College London
Rodney Harrison is Professor of Heritage Studies at the UCL Institute of Archaeology and AHRC Heritage Priority Area Leadership Fellow. He is Principal Investigator of the AHRC-funded Heritage Futures Research Programme; Director of the Heritage Futures Laboratory at UCL; and leads... Read More →
DE

Dan Evans

Lancaster University
GG

Geneviève Godin

UiT the Arctic University of Norway
GO

Gabriele Oropallo

London Metropolitan University
HC

Helen Chittock

AOC Archaeology Group
KM

Koji Mizoguchi

Kyushu University


Tuesday December 17, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 777/80 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

ESRI: No Stress GIS! #1 **Booking required**
**Attendees must book in advance on Evenbrite**

Knowing where finds come from is fundamental to theorising about them. Yet many of us still feel underprepared using GIS for plotting our data in space and time. This workshop covers the basics of quick and easy mapping, digital data collection and visualisation for archaeologists. If you’re:
  • Planning a dissertation
  • Wondering how to make your next poster presentation stand out
  • Want to save time in the field with data collection
  • Increase the impact of your research
  • Or simply need better maps  
Come along and experience… GIS WITHOUT the stress! No prior experience necessary and no software installation required.


Tuesday December 17, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
PC Lab 2 (Level 4, in IOE Library) 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG35 | Sensory Archaeology across Space and Time
The study of the past is currently experiencing a spatial and sensory turn, affecting the work of prehistorians, classical, medieval, and historical archaeologists alike. Across disciplines sensory archaeology allows us to engage with, and challenge, our knowledge of the past through experience and experimentation. Despite the benefits and a growing number of approaches developed by specialists in different fields, attempts to develop a diachronic conversation on the matter have been limited. The aim of this session is to bring together scholars from a variety of backgrounds to create a lively and challenging setting to discuss new theoretical and methodological approaches to sensory archaeology. By exploring an interdisciplinary and cross-period consensus, this session aims to advance the ongoing debate about the potential of this relatively new discipline to engage with specific themes across space and time.The session draws upon three themes across any period; Experiences of ‘Body', ‘Place' and ‘Materials', as well as engaging with the conference’s broader theme; Power, Knowledge and the Past. The session will adopt a mixed format consisting of traditional presentations, followed by a ‘hands-on’ session with multiple participants demonstrating a sensory approach. Participants will be able to interact with different materials across several tables to allow for a sensory experience within the session.

Organisers: Nicky Garland; Newcastle University • Dr Giacomo Savani; University College Dublin • Adam Parker (PhD Candidate); Open University

14:00 | Nicky Garland, Newcastle University; Adam Parker (PhD Candidate), Open University; Dr Giacomo Savani, University College Dublin | Introduction

14:05 | Dr Kelly Britt, Brooklyn College, CUNY | Somatic Mapping: Historic Landscapes Empowering Future Communities

14:30 | Dr Dan Stewart, School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester | The Power of Place in Greek Archaeology: The Impact of Text on Sensory Experience

14:55 | Andrew Watson (PhD Candidate), University of Glasgow | Archaeology of the past, present and future!

15:20 | Adam Parker (PhD Candidate), Open University; Dr Erica Rowan, Royal Holloway, University of London; Nicholas Groat (PhD Student), Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield; Chloe Clark (Phd Candidate), Kings College London | Workshops: 1) Jet-Set: Sensory experiences of Whitby Jet in Britain 2) Eating Saturnalia: Authenticity and Seasonality 3) The essence of experience: exploring a sensory approach to early distillation practices 4) Colour of the dead

15:40 | - | BREAK

16:00 | Adam Parker (PhD Candidate), Open University; Dr Erica Rowan, Royal Holloway, University of London; Nicholas Groat (PhD Student), Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield; Chloe Clark (Phd Candidate), Kings College London | Workshops continued

16:25 | Prof. Sue Hamilton, Institute of Archaeology, UCL; Prof. Ruth Whitehouse, Institute of Archaeology, UCL | Revisiting Sacred and Profane: ‘domain change’ in south Italian prehistory

16:50 | Chloe Clark, Kings College London | Colour of the dead

17:15 | Nicky Garland, Newcastle University; Adam Parker (PhD Candidate), Open University; Dr Giacomo Savani, University College Dublin | Final Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
NG

Nicky Garland

Newcastle University
DG

Dr Giacomo Savani

University College Dublin
DK

Dr Kelly Britt

Brooklyn College, CUNY
DD

Dr Dan Stewart

School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester
AW

Andrew Watson (PhD Candidate)

University of Glasgow
DE

Dr Erica Rowan

Royal Holloway, University of London
PS

Prof. Sue Hamilton

Institute of Archaeology, UCL
PR

Prof. Ruth Whitehouse

Institute of Archaeology, UCL
CC

Chloe Clark

Kings College London
DE

Dr Emma J. Wells

University of York


Tuesday December 17, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 731/6 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG43 | Women and Power? From Conversation to Action
2017 saw the publication of Mary Beard’s bestseller Women and Power, and the explosion of the #MeToo movement across social media. Billed as a manifesto, Beard’s book takes a historical approach rather than explicitly outlining inclusive and intersectional practical steps for supporting women’s power in modern, multi-vocal archaeology. There is clearly a pressing need now to move beyond conversations about women*’s experiences of archaeology both in and outside of the academy and look for concrete action. This is most keenly needed at intersections of class, race, sexuality, dis/ability, and in the experience of people identifying as non-binary or trans.

There has now been more than a decade of studies including gender feminist theorisations of the past as well as surveys of the profession providing the data that show change is urgently required. This was pioneered by the British Women Archaeologists group, but today numerous other organisations are working toward positive change in the discipline. This includes CIfA’s Equality and Diversity Group, Enabled Archaeology, BAJR RESPECT campaign, and Women’s Classical Committee while TrowelBlazers have raised the profile of women in archaeology more widely. Some informal actions have taken place including the establishment of a Mentoring group on Facebook, but now is the time for institutions and employers to step up and effect real change.

This session is aimed at bringing together many voices to speak, and to listen. The panel will include representatives from a number of groups for an open discussion chaired by Trowelblazers examining the following questions:

• What is the historical context of women’s success in archaeology?
• What are remaining barriers to inclusion?
• What current practices are working and can be built on, particularly those that ensure work to promote women is itself inclusive?

Following this we will outline a draft best practice document containing actionable steps which organisations can use to make more radical and meaningful changes to attract, support and retain women in archaeological careers.
As an inspiring case study we will open the session by screening a short documentary on the role of women within a conflict archaeology research collective.
We look forward to a challenging, open and productive session.


Organisers: Penny Coombe; University of Oxford • Cecilia Dal Zovo; CSIC • Beth Hodgett; Birkbeck College, University of London & Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford.

14:00 | Session organisers | Introduction

14:10 | Rebeca Blanco-Rotea, G.I. Síncrisis, University of Santiago de Compostela; Sara Traba, Independent Researcher | Conflict Archaeology: an audiovisual project on the invisibility of women in certain archaeologies

14:40 | Becky Wragg Sykes, Independent scholar / Trowelblazers; Brenna Hassett, UCL; Suzanne Pilaar Birch, Trowelblazers; Victoria Herridge, Trowelblazers; Anne Teather, British Women Archaeologists (BWA); Rachel Pope, British Women Archaeologists (BWA) and University of Liverpool; Laura Hampden, Museum Detox; Laura Hampden, Historic England, Museum Detox, CIfA Equality and Diversity Group; Hannah Cobb, University of Manchester; Penelope Foreman, Clwyd Powys Archaeological Trust; Penelope Foreman, Enabled Archaeology | Open Workshop participant

15:20 | - | BREAK

15:50 | Becky Wragg Sykes, Independent scholar / Trowelblazers; Brenna Hassett, UCL; Suzanne Pilaar Birch, Trowelblazers; Victoria Herridge, Trowelblazers; Anne Teather, British Women Archaeologists (BWA); Rachel Pope, British Women Archaeologists (BWA) and University of Liverpool; Laura Hampden, Museum Detox; Laura Hampden, Historic England, Museum Detox, CIfA Equality and Diversity Group; Hannah Cobb, University of Manchester; Penelope Foreman, Clwyd Powys Archaeological Trust; Penelope Foreman, Enabled Archaeology | Open Workshop participant

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
RB

Rebeca Blanco-Rotea

G.I. Síncrisis, University of Santiago de Compostela
ST

Sara Traba

Independent Researcher
BW

Becky Wragg Sykes

Trowelblazers
VH

Victoria Herridge

Trowelblazers
AT

Anne Teather

British Women Archaeologists (BWA)
RP

Rachel Pope

British Women Archaeologists (BWA) and University of Liverpool
LH

Laura Hampden

Museum Detox
HC

Hannah Cobb

University of Manchester
PF

Penelope Foreman

Clwyd Powys Archaeological Trust
PC

Penny Coombe

University of Oxford
BH

Beth Hodgett

Birkbeck College, University of London & Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford.


Tuesday December 17, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 802/4 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG10 | Archaeologia Hookland: the archaeology of a lost County in England
Have you ever been to Hookland? This lost county, located somewhere in England, has a fine collection of megaliths, standing stones and barrows, but their cataloguing has never been satisfactorily completed, and deeper physical investigations have generally ended badly. In other words, Hookland provides a rare opportunity and starting point to explore notions of archaeology in relation to places of the imagination.The county even has its own museum, The Hookland Museum of Curiosities, which contains (reputedly) only objects found in the County under all manner of circumstances; no comprehensive inventory exists. Yet archaeological interest in this County has increased in recent years, prompted by curious entries in the The Phoenix Guide to England, and the discovery of a complete run of the journal Archaeologia Hookland found in the Ashmolean by author and folklorist C.L. Nolan.

For those intimate with Hookland, we offer the opportunity to explore and celebrate its archaeology, both in terms of its ancient and more recent past (from the Toad Stone to the pylon’s hum), but also the dark history of surveys, excavations, curses and wyrd discoveries that litter the pages of Archaeologia Hookland. For others, we encourage proposals for papers, talks and creative contributions on the themes of folk horror archaeology, the archaeology of lost and fictional places, and all things landscape punk.

Organisers: Kenny Brophy; University of Glasgow • Dr. Katy Soar; University of Winchester

14:00 | Session organisers | Introduction

14:05 | David Southwell, Hookland | The barrow is never empty – ghost soil excavations in Hookland

14:20 | Christopher Josiffe, Independent researcher | Hookland antiquary, Edgar Snell

14:35 | James Mansfield, University of Reading | A fantasy of the lay-by

14:50 | Lee Ravitz, Independent researcher | Lure of the past, Lordly Hole, Intertextuality and Imposture

15:05 | - | BREAK

15:35 | Katy Whitaker, Historic England | The Toadstones of England

15:45 | Sophie Cathcart, University of Glasgow; Kenny Brophy, University of Glasgow | Spooky stone circles and sinister standing stones: megalith exploitation movies 1957-1990

16:00 | Martyn Barber, Historic England | “People of our own blood” – the archaeology of folk horror/the folk horror of archaeology

16:15 | David Petts, Durham University | “Will you search through the loamy earth for me?”: Towards a Psychogeography of Danebury (Essex)

16:30 | Ian Parker Heath, Enrichment Through Archaeology | Wicker's New World - sacrificing yourself for fun!

16:40 | Dr. Katy Soar, University of Winchester | “The place of the treasure-house of them that dwell below”: barrows in folklore and folk horror

16:55 | Rebecca Davies, University of Plymouth | Marshwood Vale Forest – a land apart. Oral history of a Hookland royal forest

17:05 | Session organisers | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
CJ

Christopher Josiffe

Independent researcher
JM

James Mansfield

University of Reading
LR

Lee Ravitz

Independent researcher
KW

Katy Whitaker

Historic England
SC

Sophie Cathcart

University of Glasgow
KB

Kenny Brophy

University of Glasgow
MB

Martyn Barber

Historic England
DP

David Petts

Durham University
IP

Ian Parker Heath

Enrichment Through Archaeology
DK

Dr. Katy Soar

University of Winchester
RD

Rebecca Davies

University of Plymouth


Tuesday December 17, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 826 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG16 | What counts as knowledge in the museum and heritage sector, and how can this influence the quality of decision-making using diverse sources of knowledge and evidence?
This session will examine different types of knowledge, how they are produced, exchanged, used, interact with each other, but also how they are used to inform policy and decision-making in the heritage and museum sector. The papers will examine everyday or vernacular knowledge as well as epistemic knowledge; how different types of knowledge are represented and given a voice in heritage and museum organisations; and the mechanisms through which we do that (e.g. Responsible Research and Innovation, co-creation and other participatory approaches to developing knowledge).

Organisers: Theano Moussouri; UCL • Raffaella Cecilia; UCL • Ellen Pavey; UCL • Hana Morel; UCL

14:00 | Session organisers | Introduction

14:10 | Theano Moussouri, UCL; Hana Morel, UCL |

14:30 | Alison Edwards, University of York | Communicating Complexity: How can we put the Theories of Heritage into Practice?

14:50 | Ellen Pavey, UCL | Making the Invisible Visible: Communicating Hidden Practices in the Contemporary Art Museum

15:10 | Francesca Dolcetti, University of York; Dr. Rachel Opitz, University of Glasgow; Dr. Sara Perry, University of York | UX and Participatory Design in Archaeology and Heritage

15:30 | - | BREAK

16:00 | Zenobie Garrett, University of Oklahoma | Remixing the Recipe: the role of libraries in the production of heritage

16:20 | Nathaniel Welsby, University of Lancashire; Scott Bound, University of Chester | Did we Fall Down? A Discussion of Archaeology’s Standing with the Public

16:40 | Theano Moussouri, UCL; Hana Morel, UCL | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
AE

Alison Edwards

University of York
FD

Francesca Dolcetti

University of York
DR

Dr. Rachel Opitz

University of Glasgow
NW

Nathaniel Welsby

University of Lancashire
SB

Scott Bound

University of Chester


Tuesday December 17, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 828 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG27 | The treatment of the dead in current archaeological practice: exploring knowledge gain, value and the ethical treatment of remains from burial ground excavations for HS2 in a national and international context
The treatment of the dead in current archaeological practice: exploring knowledge gain, value and the ethical treatment of remains from current major burial ground excavations for HS2 in London and Birmingham, alongside comparative investigations in the UK, Europe and internationally. The current archaeological excavations at two large urban cemeteries at St James Gardens, Euston, and Park Street Gardens, Birmingham, as part of the HS2 Historic Environment Research and Delivery Strategy, are providing significant insights into the treatment of the dead in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The identification of named individuals, including the recent discovery of Captain Matthew Flinders, has also raised the profile of historical human remains in the present and the potential political significance of such discoveries. The scale of the burial ground excavations at Park St and St James, with the latter containing tens of thousands of buried individuals, raises questions about contemporary attitudes to the mass excavation of human remains. Excavations of human remains at this scale place a focus upon ethical and social considerations regarding their treatment through the processes of excavation, study and reburial as well as the personal responses of those involved in the excavation process. Archaeological excavation may be considered an acceptable treatment of the remains of the dead, in return for scientific knowledge. It is, however, necessary to consider how archaeological excavation and scientific study of human remains contribute to our understanding of past societies, how research aims are determined and what the potential impact of that knowledge is to those in the present. The session will explore attitudes to the treatment of the dead in present and past societies, how burial ground excavations are perceived from a public and political perspective and question the processes of selection for study. Papers will discuss these themes with comparative burial ground studies in the UK, Europe and United States.

Organisers: Michael Court; HS2 • Andrea Bradley; HS2 Ltd. • John Halsted; HS2

14:00 | Session organisers | Introduction

14:10 | Mary Ruddy, WSP; Mike Kimber, MHI | Doing the right thing? A can of ethical worms.

14:35 | Caroline Raynor, Costain-Skanska | The social impact and effects on wellbeing of working with human remains at St James’s Gardens, Euston

15:00 | John Lawson, City of Edinburgh Council | Archaeology through the fence line: The excavation of medieval human remains in Leith

15:25 | - | BREAK

15:55 | Kae Neustadt, Atkins | The challenges of scientific research on human remains – a comparison with the work of colleagues in the USA

16:20 | Louise Loe, Oxford Archaeology | Identifying the Missing: The excavation of First World War Mass Graves at Fromelles, Northern France

16:45 | Katie Dalmon, University of Alba Iulia, Romania | Improving scientific research outcomes from human remains excavated in Romania

17:10 | Andrea Bradley, HS2 Ltd. | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
CR

Caroline Raynor

Costain-Skanska
JL

John Lawson

City of Edinburgh Council
KD

Katie Dalmon

University of Alba Iulia, Romania
LL

Louise Loe

Oxford Archaeology
AB

Andrea Bradley

The University of York


Tuesday December 17, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 784 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG29 | Power over Practice in the Contracting Sector
This session will examine how modern practice has been shaped by the environments within which archaeological work is undertaken. Papers are largely drawn from contributors at MOLA, a large archaeology and built heritage practice which has methodological development at its heart but has to function within the conservative construction sector. The professionalisation of archaeology has occurred in tandem with changes in planning guidance, construction sector legislation and on-site management. But have these been reflected in our fieldwork methodologies? Are we adapting to suit these new conditions, or are we merely working harder to fit with increased pressures? Do the new systems in use on infrastructure projects add to the value of our practice, or reduce it? Do we have examples of successful modifications of project designs to suit these new conditions or are we still trying to maintain existing methodologies? Can we improve or adapt our input into development projects to enhance the experience for the practitioners themselves? What can archaeology offer developments and do we have the power to embed it into projects? This is a wide-ranging theme that should be considered from both theoretical and practical viewpoints so papers are sought from across the contracting sector and are particularly encouraged from those who wouldn’t usually participate at TAG.

Organisers: Sadie Watson; MOLA

14:00 | Sadie Watson, MOLA | Introduction

14:15 | Alison Telfer, MOLA | View from the trench edge: reflections on working conditions in commercial archaeology, borrowing the main objective categories used in the National Planning Policy Framework – economic, social and environmental

14:35 | Daniel Phillips, DRP Archaeology | The Rise and Rise of Viability in Planning: An Archaeological Perspective

14:55 | Catherine Gibbs, MOLA | An archaeologist’s view of consortiums

15:15 | Claudia Tommasino, MOLA | Training adults: is it a processual and post-processual endeavour?

15:35 | - | BREAK

16:05 | Jessica Bryan, MOLA | Type III fun: archaeology and infrastructure

16:25 | Heather Knight, MOLA | ‘A Deep Sense of Voicefulness’

16:45 | Sadie Watson, MOLA | Discussion

17:30 | - | END


Tuesday December 17, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 790 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG32 | If wisdom *sits* in places, does that mean it has a body? Scalar links between mobility, embodiment, and archaeological knowledge
While movement is fundamental to processes that archaeologists study, it also poses some of the greatest challenges: material records—in their many manifestations—rely on stasis as well as movement. Approaching movement entails engaging with scalar problems, as archaeologists “move” between isotopes, populations, artifacts, skeletal remains, infrastructures, texts, subjects and authors, and landscapes. We propose an exploration of the body and embodiment as entry-points into such interpretive challenges. Might the body be a locus at which wildly disparate scales intersect and can be made commensurate?Archaeologists are increasingly theorizing movement and mobility in their analyses of people and things. While engagements with the “new materialism” invite an exploration of the ways in which materials and substances are in flux, studies of globalization and the Anthropocene attend to global flows of people and things. The embodied subject—one that moves, perceives, dreams, does—adds another interpretive challenge in archaeological knowledge-making practices. Perceptions and experiences were not only situated in past bodies, but the reconstruction of those experiences is also situated in the embodied practices of archaeologists.

Organisers: Alanna Warner-Smith (Doctoral Candidate); Department of Anthropology, Syracuse University • Kate Franklin; Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London

14:00 | Alanna Warner-Smith (Doctoral Candidate), Department of Anthropology, Syracuse University; Kate Franklin, Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London | Introduction

14:05 | Alanna Warner-Smith (Doctoral Candidate), Department of Anthropology, Syracuse University | Aching Joints, Global Frictions: Preliminary Thoughts on a Bioarchaeology of Pain and Labor

14:15 | Rachael Kiddey PhD, British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship Researcher, School of Archaeology, Oxford University | “It can go to Oxford, even if I can’t!”: the material culture of contemporary forced displacement in Europe

14:25 | Alexander Aston, School of Archaeology, University of Oxford | Scale and Scalability: A Novel Perspective on the Emergence of Cycladic Bodies

14:35 | Lesley McFadyen, Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck | The orientation and direction of force: volatile bodies revisited

14:45 | Kate Franklin, Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London | Silk Road synesthesia: embodied imaginaries and scalar transforms

14:55 | Colleen Morgan PhD, Lecturer in Digital Archaeology and Heritage, Department of Archaeology, The University of York | What and where is the digital body in archaeology?

15:05 | - | BREAK

15:35 | Session organisers | Panel discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
AW

Alanna Warner-Smith (Doctoral Candidate)

Department of Anthropology, Syracuse University
KF

Kate Franklin

Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London
AA

Alexander Aston

School of Archaeology, University of Oxford
LM

Lesley McFadyen

Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck


Tuesday December 17, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 822 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG33 | Reassessing the Archaeology of Religion
Archaeologists generally discuss religion via two paths: the tangible material manifestations of religious practice and intangible theory based upon modern reconstructions. This session aims to unite material and theory to present a holistic view of religion. The focus will be on the theoretical and methodological problems at the foundation of archaeologies of religion, including definitions of religion in archaeology, the application of concepts and methods from the study of religion to archaeology, and the archaeological contribution to knowledge about religion(s). Historically, religious practices were integrated into all other practices within almost all culture groups, and our theoretical discussions need to begin to address the entanglements within the material culture we uncover and the cultures we reconstruct. Furthermore, the session will ask how archaeological knowledge of religion(s) is produced and involved in broader discourses in academia and beyond. This session aims to bring together a wide range of research, both geographically and temporally, to provide a rounded conversation that ultimately addresses how archaeologists can reconstruct religion.

Organisers: Brooke Creager; University of Minnesota • Peter Kahlke Olesen; University of Copenhagen

14:00 | Session organisers | Introduction

14:10 | Sophia Marques, University College London | When is it useful to do an archaeology of religion?

14:25 | Ross McIntire, University of York | In the Footsteps of the Saints: Buildings, Sacred Landscapes, and the Pilgrims’ Experience beyond the Shrine

14:40 | Simon Kaner, Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures; Andrew Hutcheson, Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures | Nara to Norvic: the Arrival of Belief, religion and archaeology at the extremities of the Silk Roads AD 500-1000

14:55 | Peter Kahlke Olesen, University of Copenhagen | Rock Art and Ritual Drama in Bronze Age Scandinavia: Image, Myth, and Ritual in Comparative Religion

15:10 | - | BREAK

15:40 | Tõnno Jonuks, Estonian Literary Museum | The problem of analogies – East-European perspective to the archaeology of religion

15:55 | Zenta Broka-Lāce, Institute of Latvian History, University of Latvia | Ancient Latvian Religion: Attempts to Reconstruct ''Pagan'' Religious Praxes in 20s and 30s of the 20th Century

16:10 | John Soderberg, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Denison University | Why does the archaeology of religion need a biology of religion?

16:25 | Brooke Creager, University of Minnesota | Identifying Religious Meaning

16:40 | Peter Kahlke Olesen, University of Copenhagen; Brooke Creager, University of Minnesota | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
SM

Sophia Marques

University College London
RM

Ross McIntire

University of York
SK

Simon Kaner

Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures
AH

Andrew Hutcheson

Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures
PK

Peter Kahlke Olesen

University of Copenhagen
TJ

Tõnno Jonuks

Estonian Literary Museum
ZB

Zenta Broka-Lāce

Institute of Latvian History, University of Latvia
JS

John Soderberg

Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Denison University
BC

Brooke Creager

University of Minnesota


Tuesday December 17, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Clarke Hall (Level 3) 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG38 | The social production of money: archaeological perspectives
Money is a commonplace of complex societies, and evidence for its production and use appears in the archaeological record at multiple scales: from individual coins, dies, and weights, to mint buildings, metallurgical workshops, and mining complexes. The character, scope, and volume of this evidence means that archaeology can offer significant and unique contributions to wider anthropological and sociological debates concerning the socio-cultural processes by which money comes into being: how are objects transformed into money, how are different forms of money rendered legitimate or illegitimate, and how are the social conventions behind money maintained or challenged by its producers and (non)users? This session explores the social production of money and moneys in past societies, with a focus on five key themes:

•The assignation of value to monetary media
•Legitimation and validation of moneys
•Fungibility and commensuration of moneys
•Money and institutions
•Hierarchies of money

Organisers: Murray Andrews; UCL • Olav Gundersen; Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo

14:00 | Session organisers | Introduction

14:10 | Piotr Jacobsson, Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre | Beyond earlier Holocene commodification in south-west Asia

14:30 | Charlotte Mann, University of Warwick | Spent or Saved? The Circulation of Festival Coins Struck for the Eleusinian Mysteries

14:50 | Tais Pagoto Bélo, Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, University of São Paulo | Coins and Roman Women’s Power

15:10 | Dagfinn Skre, Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo | A social approach to money. Scandinavia in the 5th-10th centuries

15:30 | Murray Andrews, UCL | Discussion

15:40 | - | BREAK

16:10 | Martin Allen, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge | Rendlesham: the use of coins at a high status early medieval site

16:30 | Svein H Gullbekk, Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo | Legitimizing money

16:50 | Laura Burnett, University of Exeter | "For the benefit of the poor"?

17:10 | Olav Gundersen, Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
PJ

Piotr Jacobsson

Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre
CM

Charlotte Mann

University of Warwick
DS

Dagfinn Skre

Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo
MA

Martin Allen

Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge
SH

Svein H Gullbekk

Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo
LB

Laura Burnett

University of Exeter
OG

Olav Gundersen

Independent Researcher


Tuesday December 17, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 728 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG41 | Palaeolithic societies, sociality and social life: archaeological perspectives 20 years after Gamble (1999)
Twenty years ago, Gamble’s “Palaeolithic Societies of Europe” was published, representing a landmark moment in the study of the social lives of both archaic hominins and early members of our own species, Homo sapiens. For arguably the first time, Palaeolithic populations, and the archaeological record which they generated, were analysed within an explicitly social framework interpreted in terms of the nested scales of social networks and the resultant interactions within and between individuals, groups, and regional populations. Two decades later, social approaches have become fundamental to Palaeolithic archaeology. However, the Palaeolithic archaeological record does look rather different. Not only does it now extend back in time to 3.3 million years ago, but it also incorporates at least three new hominin species (Homo floresiensis, Homo naledi, the Denisovans and possibly a fourth, Homo luzonensis), and falls increasingly under the purview of geneticists, whose research provides unique insights into hominin interactions and evolution. What has been the impact of these developments on how we conceive of Palaeolithic society, and what should be research priorities moving forward? Taking the 20th anniversary of Gamble (1999) as our impetus, we invite papers from researchers working on all aspects of Palaeolithic society, social life, and sociality, broadly defined. Papers are welcome from all Palaeolithic sub-periods, geographic regions, and theoretical perspectives. Possible topics include, but are not limited to: population connectivity and landscape use; group size, life history and demography; social organisation and economic strategies, including the role of individuals of different ages and sexes in Palaeolithic societies. Complementary perspectives from scholars working on primate archaeology or early farming societies are also welcome.

Organisers: Jenni French; UCL • Fiona Coward; Bournemouth University

14:00 | Jenni French, UCL; Fiona Coward, Bournemouth University | Introduction

14:10 | Becky Wragg Sykes, Independent scholar / Trowelblazers | Neanderthal Revolutions: radical manifestos for Palaeolithic Societies

14:25 | Gail Hitchens, University of York | Carrying on with Neanderthal mobility: a new approach to understanding group movement

14:40 | Annemieke Milks, UCL; Sheina Lew-Levy, Simon Fraser University; Noa Lavi, University of Haifa; Rachel Reckin, University of Cambridge; David Friesem, NA | Creative, influential, and daring! A review of the archaeological evidence for prehistoric hunter-gatherer children

14:55 | April Nowell, University of Victoria | Reconsidering the personhood of Gravettian infants

15:10 | Session organisers | Discussion

15:30 | - | BREAK

16:00 | Juana Maria Olives Pons, Max Planck Institute of Social Anthropology; Jordi Estévez Escalera, ARESOCARE-UAB | The social regulation of reproduction among hunter-gather-gatherers: an interdisciplinary and experimental approach

16:15 | Matt Grove, University of Liverpool | An unbounded social landscape: demography, complexity, and inter-assemblage variability

16:30 | Natasha Reynolds, University of Bordeaux | Scaling up, scaling down: how to describe a heterogeneous European Upper Palaeolithic record

16:45 | Taryn Bell, University of York | Emotional baggage? Emotion, material culture and social life in the Palaeolithic

17:00 | Clive Gamble, University of Southampton | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
FC

Fiona Coward

Bournemouth University
GH

Gail Hitchens

University of York
SL

Sheina Lew-Levy

Simon Fraser University
NL

Noa Lavi

University of Haifa
RR

Rachel Reckin

University of Cambridge
AN

April Nowell

University of Victoria
JM

Juana Maria Olives Pons

Max Planck Institute of Social Anthropology
MG

Matt Grove

University of Liverpool
NR

Natasha Reynolds

University of Bordeaux
TB

Taryn Bell

University of York
BW

Becky Wragg Sykes

Trowelblazers
CG

Clive Gamble

University of Southampton


Tuesday December 17, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 739 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG47 | Persistent Pasts: Engaging with Conflict Legacies in the Present
Conflict both destroys and creates on a local and global scale, reconfiguring existing landscapes, power structures, beliefs and practices, and in the process forges - and often enforces - new and distinctive human-thing relationships.This session invites papers focussing on the reuse of material cultures and/or landscapes of conflict from prehistory to the present day. The session welcomes, but is not limited to, contributions covering themes such as transformation and (re)appropriation of landscapes and objects, material persistence, material/human resistance, destruction/creation of lifeworlds, human/non-human entanglements, conflicts over natural and cultural resources, conflicts in and over the Anthropocene, and practices of recycling within conflict or post-conflict settings. Papers proposing new theoretical and conceptual approaches to living with and transforming conflict legacies are particularly encouraged, as are contributions which draw on materials and case studies from a range of different contexts, including indigenous and non-Western perspectives.(Please note: the first half of this session picks up themes from the linked Session 46: Archaeology and Heritage Studies in, of and after the Anthropocene, and participants are encouraged to attend both sessions to facilitate discussion between and across them).

Organisers: Esther Breithoff; Birkbeck, University of London

14:00 | Esther Breithoff, Birkbeck, University of London | Session Introduction

14:05 | Emma Waterton, Western Sydney University; Hayley Saul, Western Sydney University | Ghosts of the Anthropocene:
Spectral Accretions at the Port Arthur Historic Site

14:25 | Anatolijs Venovcevs, UiT The Arctic University of Norway | Repairing Towards… Living with Landscapes Scars

14:45 | Oladimeji Oluwadamilare Salami, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria; Veronica Oluwatobi Afenkhena , Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria | Political power, migration and modernity: archaeological exploration into Nigeria’s socio-politico-economic present

15:05 | Israel Hinojosa Baliño, Durham University | Icxitoca: From conjectural paradigm to retrospective predictions

15:25 | - | BREAK

15:55 | John Winterburn, University of Oxford | Shankill Poppies: defining an urban conflict landscape

16:15 | marjolijn kok, Independent researcher/Bureau Archeologie en Toekomst | Single places harbouring multiple conflicts; hidden by design, remembered selectively

16:35 | Jacques Aymeric Nsangou, University of Geneva | Antagonistic evolution of two elements of an African fortification in Foumban, West Cameroon

16:55 | Session organisers | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
EB

Esther Breithoff

Birkbeck, University of London
EW

Emma Waterton

Western Sydney University
HS

Hayley Saul

Western Sydney University
AV

Anatolijs Venovcevs

UiT The Arctic University of Norway
OO

Oladimeji Oluwadamilare Salami

Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria
VO

Veronica Oluwatobi Afenkhena

Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria
IH

Israel Hinojosa Baliño

Durham University
JW

John Winterburn

University of Oxford
MK

marjolijn kok

Independent researcher/Bureau Archeologie en Toekomst
JA

Jacques Aymeric Nsangou

University of Geneva


Tuesday December 17, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 777/80 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

ESRI: No Stress GIS! #2 **Booking required**
**Attendees must book in advance on Evenbrite**

Knowing where finds come from is fundamental to theorising about them. Yet many of us still feel underprepared using GIS for plotting our data in space and time. This workshop covers the basics of quick and easy mapping, digital data collection and visualisation for archaeologists. If you’re:
  • Planning a dissertation
  • Wondering how to make your next poster presentation stand out
  • Want to save time in the field with data collection
  • Increase the impact of your research
  • Or simply need better maps  
Come along and experience… GIS WITHOUT the stress! No prior experience necessary and no software installation required.


Tuesday December 17, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
PC Lab 2 (Level 4, in IOE Library) 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

Objective fail: material stories of things going wrong
Those wishing to attend this workshop should gather shortly before 2pm at the meeting point near to the conference registration desk in the foyer of the Institute of Education. The group will then progress to the Octagon Gallery just after 2pm.

The workshop will commence with a behind-the-scenes tour of the Octagon Gallery, led by the curators which will be followed by a handling sessions with some of the objects, artworks, specimens and items that had been considered for the exhibition but failed to be selected.

These material encounters will enable participants to critically examine what failure means in different contexts and in particular to interrogate the frequently and unquestioningly used, simplistic perspectives of failure as either a disaster or a useful learning experience. Such perspectives rely on an unspoken assumption that we all know, and agree upon, what failure is, which directly responds to the theme of this year’s TAG meeting, as it highlights the inherent power dynamics behind what it means to succeed or to fail.

During the workshop participants will be invited to link their own stories of failure, whether personal, professional or imagined, with one of the objects they encounter. These stories will then form the jumping off point for a critical conversation on the role failure plays/played in the past, present and future. We will aim to capture the content of this conversation in a creative and participatory way so that it can be shared with others not attending the session.

Organiser details:

Thomas Kador, UCL, t.kador@ucl.ac.uk
Vesna Lukic, Middlesex University, v.lukic@mdx.ac.uk
Coinciding with an exhibition at the UCL Octagon Gallery focusing on the topic of failure (on show October 2019 to February 2020) this workshop invites participants to engage hands-on with failure as a concept.

Tuesday December 17, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Conference meeting point near to registration desk UCL Institute of Education (IOE) 20 Bedford Way London WC1H 0A

3:30pm

Bricks + Mortals, A history of eugenics told through buildings **BOOKING REQUIRED**
Those joining this tour should gather at the meeting point by the conference registration desk (in the IOE foyer) just before 3.30pm.

Join historian, curator of UCL Science Collections and UCL Archaeology alumnus Subhadra Das on a walking tour of the UCL campus to hear the story of UCL's pioneering eugenicists through the landmark buildings and spaces named after them.  Among these are the Galton Lecture Theatre, the Pearson Building and the Petrie Museum. The contributions Francis Galton, Karl Pearson and Flinders Petrie to biometrics, statistics and archaeology are well known in those fields and beyond. What is less well known is their contribution to developing, establishing and legitimising the science of eugenics. Eugenics -- the science of improving human populations through selective breeding -- is generally associated with the Nazis, but in fact had its roots in Britain. The story of this origin is seldom told.

Number are limited so we are asking participants to pre-register using Eventbrite:
Register to join the walking tour

Speakers
SD

Subhadra Das

UCL & Museum Detox Member


Tuesday December 17, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm

6:00pm

TAG Party
Conference party time! Come together on Tuesday evening to enjoy the Antiquity archaeology quiz, fantastic live music from Truly Medly Deeply and a great selection of tunes late into the night courtesy of DJs Hippocampus and friends. 


Tuesday December 17, 2019 6:00pm - Wednesday December 18, 2019 1:00am
Student Central (formerly ULU) Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HY
 
Wednesday, December 18
 

9:30am

TAG24 | FFS!!! - Keep Calm and Carry On??? Regaining Emotion in Archaeological Discourse
This session's genesis was a RESPECT forum conversation on the silencing of “emotional” women during debates, as often emotional reactions are perceived as irrational rather than calm and rational. Where there is power imbalance, the voices of marginalised groups can be dismissed for displaying emotional responses, but these responses are incredibly powerful, challenging to witness and can prompt real change. The Equality Act (2010) defines a series of Protected Characteristics - age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage/civil partnership, pregnancy & maternity, race, religion/belief, sex and sexual orientation, which it is illegal to discriminate against yet all of these characteristics to a greater or lesser extent remain marginalised within academic debate and within the archaeological/heritage professions. This matters when examining power, knowledge and the past. Individual emotive responses are all different in the same scenario - a product of upbringing, societal pressures, gender etc. How can we reframe emotion within our own experience in order to reach a level of understanding if not empathy? How can we empower more open, frank and emotional discussions which allow more voices to be heard? How are we constrained by current accepted practice of debate? We invite papers on complex and emotive issues and emphasise that this is a space where emotive responses are welcome and part of the discussion. This session is an open forum for examining responses to issues that need emotion, human behaviour and human instinct to examine them critically and effectively..

Organisers: Cat Rees; RESPECT • Penelope Foreman; Clwyd Powys Archaeological Trust • Penelope Foreman; Enabled Archaeology • Kayt Hawkins; Archaeology South-East and UCL • Aisling Nash; Independent Researcher

9:30 | Kayt Hawkins, Archaeology South-East and UCL | Emotion in Archaeology

9:40 | Cat Rees, RESPECT | Passing the baton: enabled archaeology as the norm, not the exception

10:05 | Guillermo Diaz de Liano del Valle, University of Edinburgh; Jorge Canosa Betés, Institute of Heritage Sciences, Spanish National Research Council | Disciplining the self: emotions as gatekeeping mechanisms in Archaeology

10:30 | Anouk E. Everts MPhil, University of Cologne | Lifting Isis’ Skirt: Terracotta Figurines in their Sexual Context

10:55 | - | BREAK

11:25 | D. Kalani Heinz, University of California, Los Angeles | We are Mauna Kea: Emotionally-driven archaeology as a tool for decolonization

11:50 | Session organisers |

12:00 | Session organisers |

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
KH

Kayt Hawkins

Archaeology South-East and UCL
CR

Cat Rees

RESPECT
GD

Guillermo Diaz de Liano del Valle

University of Edinburgh
JC

Jorge Canosa Betés

Institute of Heritage Sciences, Spanish National Research Council
DK

D. Kalani Heinz

University of California, Los Angeles
PF

Penelope Foreman

Clwyd Powys Archaeological Trust
AN

Aisling Nash

Independent Researcher
AE

Anouk E. Everts MPhil

University of Cologne


Wednesday December 18, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 731/6 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG49 | Publishing Power
Publishers and editors together form one of the most powerful gate-keeping groups in archaeology and academia more broadly. In this session, we invite authors, editors and publishers to discuss the power imbalances in publishing practices, both in the current landscape of neo-liberal universities and throughout the professionalization of archaeology during the twentieth century, and to explore what measures can be employed to bring about more publishing parity. Potential topics for discussion include:

Diversity
How can we ensure that under-represented groups have equal access to publishing?
What data exist to explore issues of diversity amongst e.g. authors, editorial boards, reviewers, commissioning editors etc?
What are the relationships between moves to ‘decolonise’ curricula and publishing?
Are there models and approaches in different disciplines from which archaeology might learn?

Open Access (including, but not exclusively, Plan S)
What might an Open Access future look like for archaeology?
Would an Open Access future entrench current power imbalances or bring about more equality?
Are there different sets of issues for e.g. journal and book publishing?
To what extent might this be driven by current or future REF plans?

Data sharing
Who has financial access to digital repositories such as the Archaeology Data Service?
How do issues of career precarity link to data sharing?
In what ways and to what extent are senior gate-keepers in journals playing a role in improving data sharing?

Language
There are significant access problems around language – are there potential tech solutions to these issues?
Canon vs textbooks vs public-facing (trade) books
Who gets to write the key parts of the canon?
Are textbooks and public-facing (trade) books of more importance for wider communication of archaeology?
But under-respected within academia?
What are the relationships between publication venue, publication format, accessibility and curriculum development?
What are the power networks controlling inclusion or exclusion from reading lists?

Organisers: Lisa Lodwick; University of Oxford • Zena Kamash; Royal Holloway University

9:30 | Zena Kamash, Royal Holloway University; Lisa Lodwick, University of Oxford | Publishing Power: the power nexus in 21st century academic publishing

9:40 | Amara Thornton, University of Reading | Canonising Archaeology? a publishing history

10:00 | Andrew Reinhard, American Numismatic Society | How to Publish Original Archaeological Research without Paying Open Access Fees

10:20 | Leah Hewerdine, Royal Holloway | Breaking down the barriers in grey literature and publications

10:40 | Usama Gad, Ain Shams University | Eurocentrism In Print And Digital Papyrology:
Decolonizing A Troubled Archive And A Narrative Of Knowledge And Power

11:00 | Elizabeth Brophy, John Wiley & Sons Ltd | Thinking about Open Research: Accessibility, Transparency, and Impact

11:20 | - | BREAK

11:50 | Daniel Stansbie, Cotswold Archaeology | Open access, open data, open standards (?): sharing data generated through developer funded archaeology in the United Kingdom

12:10 | Meredith Carroll, Manchester University Press; Daniel Stansbie, Cotswold Archaeology; Luiseach Nic Eoin, Nature; Leah Hewerdine, Royal Holloway; Andrew Reinhard, American Numismatic Society | Panel discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
ZK

Zena Kamash

Royal Holloway University
LL

Lisa Lodwick

University of Oxford
AT

Amara Thornton

University of Reading
AR

Andrew Reinhard

American Numismatic Society
LH

Leah Hewerdine

Royal Holloway
UG

Usama Gad

Ain Shams University
EB

Elizabeth Brophy

John Wiley & Sons Ltd
DS

Daniel Stansbie

Cotswold Archaeology
MC

Meredith Carroll

Manchester University Press


Wednesday December 18, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 826 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG06 | The Lives and Deaths of Historic Buildings: Biographical Approaches to Recording and Interpretation
Historic buildings have long been studied and recorded to further our understanding of past societies and social practices. Established methods of recording standing buildings seek to create objective architectural records of the type laid out by Historic England. These records belie a more personal and human storytelling of a place and its histories. This session will open up discussion of a range of alternative ways of articulating the ‘spirit’ of a building from embodied perspectives. Papers will draw on disciplinary methods ranging within and beyond archaeology and architecture, including forms of storytelling, image-making, artistic practices and creative writing.Inspired by Igor Kopytoff’s (1986) biographical approach to material culture, the session advances a ‘life-cycle’ model for thinking about historic buildings, considering their entire lifespans from conception, cycles of use, to eventual decrepitude, abandonment and death. Buildings are understood to accumulate person-like histories through interactions with human and non-human agencies over time. Interactions and modifications are aggregated from momentary engagements across human lifespans and passing centuries. Many buildings will have lived far longer lives than we have, and deserve the respect that we give them when we seek the gently whispered stories that they have to tell.

Organisers: Karen Fielder; Weald & Downland Living Museum • Michael Shapland; UCL

9:30 | Session organisers | Introduction

9:40 | Michael Shapland, UCL | Capturing the spirit of singular places: a biographical approach to historic building recording

10:00 | Kate Giles, University of York | Ways of telling the story of the English parish church

10:20 | Matthew Johnson, Northwestern University, USA | Bodiam Castle And Landscape: A Cultural Biography

10:40 | Ed Hollis, University of Edinburgh; Rita Alaoui, Independent Researcher | Minefields: Excavating Interiors

11:00 | Matthew Jenkins, University of York; Charlotte Newman, The University of York | London in Pieces: Building biographies in Georgian London

11:20 | - | BREAK

11:50 | Belinda Mitchell, University of Portsmouth | Matter of the Manor:The life and death of a timber joist

12:10 | Karen Fielder, Weald & Downland Living Museum | Afterlives and Spectral Buildings: Coleshill House

12:30 | Session organisers | Discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
KG

Kate Giles

University of York
MJ

Matthew Johnson

Northwestern University, USA
EH

Ed Hollis

University of Edinburgh
RA

Rita Alaoui

Independent Researcher
MJ

Matthew Jenkins

University of York
CN

Charlotte Newman

The University of York
BM

Belinda Mitchell

University of Portsmouth
KF

Karen Fielder

Weald & Downland Living Museum


Wednesday December 18, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 828 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG07 | Powerful artefacts in time and space
Powerful artefacts, a category that often includes grave goods and monumental structures, take prime positions in archaeological research and literature. From popular films to museum displays, whether the Ark of the Covenant or the Sutton Hoo helmet, our views of artefacts influence both the primacy and direction of research, and interpretations for the public. Power in artefacts can be interpreted as having been economic, ritual or social in various ways. Through their component materials, their form, their places of origin and of deposition, and sometimes their curation in the case of demonstrably old objects, archaeologists build hierarchies of power relationships. Certain objects evoke a greater sense of importance than others. This session aims to be wide-ranging and to tease out these manifestations of power, and to challenge our interpretive frameworks. We invite papers from all periods that focus on artefacts and interpretations of power in the past. Power may relate to the individual artefact, to the person with whom it is associated, or to society as a whole; or more broadly as in social-religious and/or supernatural power. Papers may also focus on the extent of power in an artefact, and to what extent it is contagious or transferable.

Organisers: Anne Teather; British Women Archaeologists (BWA) • Tess Machling; Independent Researcher • Peter Wells; University of Minnesota

9:30 | Liv Nilsson Stutz, Linnaeus University, Sweden | The Power of the Illicit. The Memory and Identity Captured and Maintained in the Illicit Objects in the Ravensbrück Prison Camp

9:50 | David Bell, Queen’s University; Caroline McGrath, Queen's University Belfast | Irish Bronze Age Cinerary Urns: A Reevaluation

10:10 | Rachel Cartwright, University of Minnesota | Brooching Power in the Viking Age

10:30 | Matthew G. Knight, National Museums Scotland | The Destruction of Power and the Power of Destruction: Decommissioning Powerful Artefacts in Bronze Age Britain

10:50 | Tânia Casimiro, IHC-NOVA University of Lisbon; António Marques, Centro de Arqueologia de Lisboa | The Lisbon Devil: A Powerful Artefact in Portuguese Middle Ages

11:10 | - | BREAK

11:40 | Misha Enayat, University of Southampton | Hierarchies of Value? A Reassessment of Exotic and Indigenous Feasting Artefacts from Iron Age Britain

12:00 | Ellen Finn, Trinity College Dublin | Making Manuports: Unmanufactured Artefacts in Archaeological Interpretation

12:20 | Pallavee Gokhale, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune | Attribute OR Artefact OR Attribute of Intangible Artefacts – A Case of Indus (Harappan) Script

12:40 | Natalia Moragas Segura, University of Barcelona; Manuel Jesús González, Autonomous University of the State of Hidalgo (Mexico) | This is not Prehispanic!!!! The Persistence of Archaeological Objects and Power Discourses in the Mass-Media

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
DB

David Bell

Queen’s University
CM

Caroline McGrath

Queen's University Belfast
RC

Rachel Cartwright

University of Minnesota
MG

Matthew G. Knight

National Museums Scotland
TC

Tânia Casimiro

IHC-NOVA University of Lisbon
AM

António Marques

Centro de Arqueologia de Lisboa
ME

Misha Enayat

University of Southampton
EF

Ellen Finn

Trinity College Dublin
PG

Pallavee Gokhale

Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune
NM

Natalia Moragas Segura

University of Barcelona
MJ

Manuel Jesús González

Autonomous University of the State of Hidalgo (Mexico)
LN

Liv Nilsson Stutz

Linnaeus University, Sweden
AT

Anne Teather

British Women Archaeologists (BWA)
TM

Tess Machling

Independent Researcher
PW

Peter Wells

University of Minnesota


Wednesday December 18, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 822 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG18 | Minds in situ: Material Approaches to Cognition in the Past
Cognitive archaeology’s aim - to study the minds of people in the past - has prompted scepticism since its beginnings. Nevertheless, the last few decades have seen a surge of interest in the archaeology of the mind. As a broad, interdisciplinary research area, a plethora of approaches have been used, leading to creative and varied research. Yet, cognitive archaeology as a whole lacks cohesion.Focusing on the fundamental role of material culture may offer a particularly useful approach for archaeologists wishing to tackle this area. Theoretical approaches like the ‘extended mind’ and Material Engagement Theory have advocated a certain materialist approach, where the mind does not consist solely of the brain. As a result, there is increasing recognition of the significant roles that our bodies and the environment, including material culture, play in our cognition.

This session will consider how archaeologists can study cognition through material culture. It encompasses a broad range of topics, including cultural transmission, craft, art, technology and evolution. While cognitive archaeology is traditionally seen as a prehistoric endeavour, it has great potential for use in any period, as seen by the papers in this session.Cognitive archaeology has been successful in helping to consider not only pathways of thought and learning in the past, but also understanding the mind in the context of behaviour, social relationships and material culture. The papers in this session reflect the potential of this area of study and demonstrate how a traditionally prehistoric endeavour can be of use more widely in archaeology.

Organisers: Dr Cory Stade; University of Southampton • Taryn Bell; University of York

9:30 | Dr Cory Stade, University of Southampton; Taryn Bell, University of York | Introduction

9:40 | Mike Groves, University of York, UK | Carving out an existence: understanding the chaîne opératoire from the inside out and making a name in woodcraft

9:55 | Paul March, University of Oxford, UK | Do extended minds have material dreams?: a Materially Enacted Phenomenological response

10:10 | Emanuele Prezioso, University of Oxford, UK | Style as memory: bridging past and present in the context of Minoan archaeology

10:25 | Alexander Aston, School of Archaeology, University of Oxford | Metaplasticity and the boundaries of social cognition: exploring scalar transformations in social interaction and intersubjectivity

10:40 | Laura Ahlqvist, Aarhus Universitet, Denmark; Christian Hoggard, University of Southampton, UK; Rune Iversen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Ditte Kofod, Bornholms Museum, Denmark; Poul Otto Nielsen, The National Museum of Denmark, Denmark; Finn Ole S. Nielsen, Bornholms Museum, Denmark; Niels N. Johannsen, Aarhus Universitet, Denmark | Mass consuming miniature meanings: analysing the carved stones of Neolithic Bornholm

10:55 | Joana Valdez-Tullett, Historic Environment Scotland | Teaching and learning Atlantic rock art: exploring cultural transmission in the Neolithic

11:10 | - | BREAK

11:40 | Izzy Wisher, Durham University | Creating art, shaping the mind: a psychological approach to Upper Palaeolithic cave art in northern Spain

11:55 | Xuanqi Zhu, University of York, UK | Tool-making and mind-making? Acheulean handaxes and the emergence of aesthetic sensibilities

12:10 | Lana Ruck, Indiana University, US and Stone Age Institute, US; Shelby S J Putt, Illinois State University, US; Zara Anwarzai, Indiana University, US and Stone Age Institute, US; P. Thomas Schoenemann, Indiana University, US and Stone Age Institute, US; Kathy Schick, Indiana University, US and Stone Age Institute, US;; Nicholas Toth, Stone Age Institute | Evolutionary perspectives on human handedness and hemispheric specialization in the brain

12:25 | Michal Paradysz, University of Liverpool, UK; Natalie Uomini, University of Liverpool, UK and Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany; Larry Barham, University of Liverpool, UK; Ryan Horsfall, University of Liverpool, UK; Georg Meyer, University of Liverpool, UK | Tracing three million years of human cognitive evolution: a neuroarchaeology study

12:40 | Dr Cory Stade, University of Southampton; Taryn Bell, University of York | Discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
DC

Dr Cory Stade

University of Southampton
TB

Taryn Bell

University of York
MG

Mike Groves

University of York, UK
PM

Paul March

University of Oxford, UK
EP

Emanuele Prezioso

University of Oxford, UK
AA

Alexander Aston

School of Archaeology, University of Oxford
LA

Laura Ahlqvist

Aarhus Universitet, Denmark
CH

Christian Hoggard

University of Southampton, UK
RI

Rune Iversen

University of Copenhagen, Denmark
DK

Ditte Kofod

Bornholms Museum, Denmark
PO

Poul Otto Nielsen

The National Museum of Denmark, Denmark
FO

Finn Ole S. Nielsen

Bornholms Museum, Denmark
NN

Niels N. Johannsen

Aarhus Universitet, Denmark
JV

Joana Valdez-Tullett

Historic Environment Scotland
IW

Izzy Wisher

Durham University
XZ

Xuanqi Zhu

University of York, UK
LR

Lana Ruck

Indiana University, US and Stone Age Institute, US
SS

Shelby S J Putt

Illinois State University, US
ZA

Zara Anwarzai

Indiana University, US and Stone Age Institute, US
PT

P. Thomas Schoenemann

Indiana University, US and Stone Age Institute, US
KS

Kathy Schick

Indiana University, US and Stone Age Institute, US;
NT

Nicholas Toth

Stone Age Institute
MP

Michal Paradysz

University of Liverpool, UK
NU

Natalie Uomini

University of Liverpool, UK and Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany
LB

Larry Barham

University of Liverpool, UK
RH

Ryan Horsfall

University of Liverpool, UK
GM

Georg Meyer

University of Liverpool, UK


Wednesday December 18, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 739 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG19 | Pathways to post-conflict remembrance
We are currently living in a time where past conflicts are lavishly commemorated, contemporary ones being followed on the world stage, while future ones dreaded with fear. Across the world, past and present conflicts and their heritages are being instrumentalized for the formation of national identities, as well as patriotic and nationalistic sentiments, and therefore holding a crucial role in ongoing shifts and changes of contemporary politics.During this session we seek papers from different social and historical contexts, which offer theoretical frameworks and/or case study approaches to various pathways of remembering and commemorating conflicts between 19th and 21st century, both in private and public domains.

Understanding memory as a contested process, we aim to examine the political, moral and ethical dynamics of post-conflict remembrance through institutional and individual efforts. The physicality/tangibility of remembrance through (for example) memorabilia, art, fashion, literature, memorials and monuments, private and public museum displays, often appears to have been the focus of various commemorative efforts and academic works. However, during this session we also invite papers exploring intangible aspects of remembrance through sound, music, oral histories and ethnographies. This will give us the opportunity to discuss and compare different disciplinary approaches and boundaries within the field of conflict memory. We are particularly interested in papers that explore one or more of the following topics:

Commemorations and politics
Ownership of the past
Commemoration and identity
Morality of remembrance
Physicality of commemoration

Organisers: Luisa Nienhaus; UCL Institute of Archaeology • Lisheng Zhang; UCL

9:30 | Luisa Nienhaus, UCL Institute of Archaeology; Lisheng Zhang, UCL | Introduction

9:45 | Ke Ye, UCL Institute of Archaeology | No monuments but a process: 70 years of retrieving looted artefacts

10:00 | Hannah Wilson, Nottingham Trent University | The Material Memory of Sobibór Death Camp: Archaeology, Artefacts and Commemoration

10:15 | Xavier Rubio-Campillo, University of Edinburgh, School of History, Classics and Archaeology / Murphy’s Toast Games | Glorious and forgotten: the remembrance of air warfare in the Spanish Civil War

10:30 | Georgia Andreou, University of Southampton | Archaeology? The materiality of post-1963 Cyprus

10:45 | Session organisers | Discussion

11:00 | - | BREAK

11:30 | Ryan Nolan, University College Dublin | Excluding the North? Marginalised memory and the legacies of conflict in the Centenary Commemorations of the 1916 Rising in Ireland

11:45 | Susan Shay, University of Cambridge | Courtroom Narrative Construction as a Tool for Indigenous Empowerment: Confronting the Authorized Past through Legal Land Claims

12:00 | Iida Käyhkö, Royal Holloway, University of London | ‘Don’t mourn, organise!’: remembrance and political activism

12:15 | Helia Marçal, Independent Researcher / Tate, London | Remembering conflict: performance art, participation, and intergenerational transmission

12:30 | Session organisers | Discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
LN

Luisa Nienhaus

UCL Institute of Archaeology
LZ

Lisheng Zhang

UCL Institute of Archaeology
KY

Ke Ye

UCL Institute of Archaeology
XR

Xavier Rubio-Campillo

University of Edinburgh/ Murphy’s Toast Games
GA

Georgia Andreou

University of Southampton
HW

Hannah Wilson

Nottingham Trent University
RN

Ryan Nolan

University College Dublin
SS

Susan Shay

University of Cambridge
IK

Iida Käyhkö

Royal Holloway, University of London
HM

Helia Marçal

Independent Researcher / Tate, London


Wednesday December 18, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 784 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG22 | Archaeology of Inequality ― Themes, Debates, Methodologies
Inequality is a contemporary hot topic. Globalization and political populism have, on the one hand, drawn more attention to the analysis of inequality in economics. On the other hand, established concepts and methods have come under attack for perhaps not exposing important dimensions of inequality (e.g Stiglitz, 2012; Michalovic, 2016).Where does archaeology and with it anthropological social theory more broadly stand with regard to the concept of inequality? In archaeology, we find both established theories and approaches as well as attempts at rethinking inequality and its conceptual neighborhood (Kohler & Smith, 2018; Price & Feinman, 2010). Inequality is intimately linked to concepts of social complexity, power, competition and co-operation, and with that broader questions concerning archaeological interpretation.In this session we wish to provide a venue for discussing archaeology of inequality, both, in terms of theoretical questions pertaining to our understanding of inequality as well as questions of in terms of identifying inequalities in archaeological practice. Topics covered in the session may include:

Inequality of what? Does social complexity equal inequality?
Hierarchy or heterarchy What is value?
Inequality as a driver of social change
Quantifying inequality
Household, settlement, and regional scales of inequality

References
Kohler, Tim & Smith, Michael E. (eds.) 2018. Ten Thousand Years of inequality: The Archaeology of Wealth Differences. Tucson: The University of Arizona Press.
Michalovic, Branko, 2016. Global Inequality: A New Approach for the Age of Globalization. London: Harvard University Press.
Price, T. Douglas & Feinman, Gary (eds.) 2010. Pathways to Power: New Perspectives on the Emergence of Social Inequality. London: Springer.
Stiglitz, Joseph E. 2012. The Price of Inequality. London: W.W. Norton & Company.

Organisers: Vesa Arponen; University of Kiel • Artur Ribeiro; University of Kiel

9:30 | V. P. J. Arponen, University of Kiel | New Inequality: Concepts and Operationalization

9:45 | Penny Bickle, University of York | Diversity vs. Inequality?

10:00 | John P. Walden, University of Pittsburgh; Michael Biggie, Los Angeles Maritime Institute; Julie A. Hoggarth, Baylor University, Texas | Examining the Role of Intermediate Elites in Determining Changing Patterns of Inequality in Status, Wealth and Wellbeing during the Rise of the Late Classic Maya Polity of Lower Dover, Belize

10:15 | Dries Daems, University of Leuven | Conceptual modelling of social complexity trajectories and inequality in urban networks.

10:30 | Adam S. Green, Cambridge University; Thomas P. Leppard, Florida State University; Toby C. Wilkinson, Cambridge University; Darryl Wilkinson, Cambridge University | Capital in the 21st Century BC: The Bronze Age Dynamics of Economic Growth and Inequality

10:45 | Darryl Wilkinson, Cambridge University; Toby C. Wilkinson, Cambridge University; Adam S. Green, Cambridge University; Thomas P. Leppard, Florida State University | A Deep History of Oligarchy

11:00 | - | BREAK

11:30 | Susanne Moraw, University of Leipzig | Iconography of Inequality: children and adolescents in the mosaics of a Late Antique Villa

11:45 | Manuel Fernández-Götz, University of Edinburgh | Debating social inequality in Iron Age research – where are we now?

12:00 | Simon Kaner, Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures; Andrew Hutcheson, Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures | Yayoi vs Iron Age: a comparison of increasingly complex settlement structures and material cultures during later prehistory in Japan and Britain

12:15 | Artur Ribeiro, University of Kiel | Environment and inequality: understanding climate and social process through the impact of the 4.2k event in Southern Iberia

12:30 | Session organisers | Discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
VP

V. P. J. Arponen

University of Kiel
PB

Penny Bickle

University of York
JP

John P. Walden

University of Pittsburgh
MB

Michael Biggie

Los Angeles Maritime Institute
JA

Julie A. Hoggarth

Baylor University, Texas
AS

Adam S. Green

Cambridge University
TP

Thomas P. Leppard

Florida State University
TC

Toby C. Wilkinson

Cambridge University
DW

Darryl Wilkinson

Cambridge University
SM

Susanne Moraw

University of Leipzig
MF

Manuel Fernández-Götz

University of Edinburgh
SK

Simon Kaner

Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures
AH

Andrew Hutcheson

Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures
AR

Artur Ribeiro

University of Kiel
VA

Vesa Arponen

University of Kiel


Wednesday December 18, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 802/4 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG37 | Curriculum Wars: Edutainment, Employability, Critical Thinking? New Archaeological Pedagogies of Power, Knowledge and Accessibility
At a time when the heritage and education sectors are both firmly in the grip of financial cutbacks, a battle ensues. It is the battle between delivering interesting and engaging content, versus providing foundations for employability, whilst also offering suitable pastoral support. Meanwhile there is an alternative view of education that it is an improving activity without the need for instrumentalization (although critical thinking may make the individual more adaptable and resilient in the face of changing skills needs). This is a challenge with a complex and interdisciplinary subject such as archaeology. Is there a need to construct an archaeological pedagogy? Or do we need to be developing multiple pedagogies to deal with and accommodate the interdisciplinary nature of archaeology?

Such interdisciplinary pedagogies need to deal with the question as to how are we expected to manage these challenges of providing an accessible rounded education to an increasingly diverse audience? Does the drive for accessibility compete with the desire to create suitable confident graduates to take up the mantle in the seemingly growing demand for industry professionals? Empowering students with knowledge and confidence could be promoted with pedagogies that can cope with the uncertainties of the current education sector. This session encourages contributors to share insights into how we continue to entice students into the sector by emphasising the wide-reaching opportunities this sector offers before they consider or reach university, and how we keep them on track into higher education given the ever-rising costs of undergraduate and postgraduate study. In these times of austerity, current trends are towards more monetarily rewarding futures. We need to identify how we meet these challenges to ensure a resilient and robust heritage sector in the future.

As part of this, theories of knowledge and power are important for archaeological purposes, and also analyses of how power and knowledge operate, are performed, and maintained in the classroom space. Diversity issues include autism, depression, gender, age and ethnicity. Support for disabilities is under financial threat, and demographic diversity may become less of a priority with increasing institutional pressures.


Organisers: Caradoc Peters; Truro College, University of Plymouth • Sally Herriett; Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Bristol / Truro College, University of Plymouth • Stuart Falconer; Open University / Truro College, University of Plymouth • Caitlin Kitchener; University of York

9:30 | Session organisers | Intro

9:35 | Don Henson, University of York | Prehistory in the curriculum: let's write a schools’ resource for the Mesolithic site of Star Carr

9:55 | Sally Herriett, Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Bristol / Truro College, University of Plymouth | It’s Not Just About Digging Holes – Understanding The Wealth Of Opportunities An Archaeology Degree Can Present

10:15 | Stuart Falconer, Open University / Truro College, University of Plymouth | So, when do we learn how to dig? Employability and existing skill sets

10:35 | Jennie Robinson, University of Leeds | The benefits of an employability teaching model

10:55 | Session organisers | Discussion

11:10 | - | BREAK

11:40 | Caitlin Kitchener, University of York | In Small Things Forgotten: PhDs, pedagogy, and teaching historical archaeology

12:00 | Caradoc Peters, Truro College, University of Plymouth | Autism -Reality & Practice

12:20 | Catriona Cooper, University of Cambridge / University of York | Multisensory pedagogy: listening and feeling as part of the learning process

12:40 | Session organisers | Discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
JR

Jennie Robinson

University of Leeds
CK

Caitlin Kitchener

University of York
CP

Caradoc Peters

Truro College, University of Plymouth
CC

Catriona Cooper

University of Cambridge / University of York
DH

Don Henson

University of York
SH

Sally Herriett

Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Bristol / Truro College, University of Plymouth
SF

Stuart Falconer

Truro College, University of Plymouth


Wednesday December 18, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 777/80 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG39 | Archaeology and the camera truelle: theorising archaeology through the moving image
By 2022, it is predicted that video will account for 82% of global internet provider traffic (CISCO 2019). In other words, the moving image is set to become humanity’s dominant form of internet communication. Is archaeology ready for this? Archaeologists have embraced filmmaking as a form of recording, reporting, and promoting their work since at least the 1910s, and today, social media abounds in archaeologist-made videos that promote or report archaeological work and values. But can we use filmmaking practices (including videography and animation) to dig deeper than functioning merely as an illustration, record, or PR? Artists, documentary filmmakers, anthropologists, and journalists have long used the medium of filmmaking to ask and answer complex questions about the world in ways the still image and the written word cannot. Borrowing Piccini’s concept of the camera truelle (‘camera trowel’, based on Astruc’s concept of the camera-stylo, or ‘camera-pen’, Astruc 1948, in Piccini 2015: 2), we suggest that for archaeology to make the most of video communications in the 21st century, archaeologists must learn to ‘write’ with the moving image.This session invites archaeologists and aligned heritage and media practitioners to discuss, screen, and share film, video, or animation works (completed or in-production) that actively use the medium of the moving image to generate and construct archaeological knowledge and theories. Speakers are also invited to develop their presentations into articles as part of a planned edited volume on the subject.

Keywords: film, video, animation, recording, drones, underwater filming, ethnographic film, CGI, 3D modelling, film archives, online platforms, databases, social media, live streaming, research design, film theory, media theory, archaeology theory.

Cisco Systems Inc. (2019) Cisco Visual Networking Index: Forecast and trends, 2017-2022. White paper. Available at: https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/solutions/collateral/service-provider/visual-networking-index-vni/white-paper-c11-741490.pdf
Piccini, A. (2015) ‘Forum: Media Archaeologies: An invitation’, Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, 2 (1), pp. 1-8.

Organisers: Kate Rogers; Department of Archaeology, University of Southampton • Angela Piccini; University of Bristol • Tanya Freke; SCAPE

9:30 | Session organisers | Introduction

9:35 | Tessa Poller, University of Glasgow | Re-living Time Past – Capturing Moments of Creation

9:53 | Jennifer Beamer, University of Leicester | Reconnecting Archaeological Textiles: Integrating Visual Media

10:11 | Dr Chloe N. Duckworth, Newcastle University | Is the lens mightier than the pen?

10:29 | Annika Larsson
(in collaboration with Mohammed Haji Younes), Uppsala University and Research Lab at University of Arts, Crafts and Design in Stockholm | Art (e) Facts: Objects as Subjects in Archaeological Research and Presentation

10:47 | - | BREAK

11:07 | Colin Seymour, University College London | Reading between the lines: Interpreting ancient murals at Belsay Castle using video and a semiotically informed analysis of heraldry

11:25 | Kate Rogers, Department of Archaeology, University of Southampton | The truth about truth in filming archaeology

11:43 | Colleen Morgan PhD, Lecturer in Digital Archaeology and Heritage, Department of Archaeology, The University of York | The disastrous fun of immersive archaeological storytelling through 360° video

12:01 | Tanya Venture, The SCAPE Trust / University of Exeter | That’s a Wrap; film as an intrinsic part of project evaluation

12:19 | Konstanza Kapsali, Filmmaker; Katerina Markoulaki, Filmmaker | Nostalgia for lost Futures: the case of Athens. A video experimentation with the palimpsest of material remains in the Greek capital.

12:37 | Jaime Almansa-Sánchez, JAS Arqueología, Madrid / Incipit-CSIC; Jesús Alonso, Independent Researcher; Felipe Muñoz, Independent Researcher; Guillermo Palomero, Complutense University of Madrid | Four views on a dildo, and other stories of #fakearchaeology

12:55 | Session organisers | Closing statements

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
TP

Tessa Poller

University of Glasgow
JB

Jennifer Beamer

University of Leicester
DC

Dr Chloe N. Duckworth

Newcastle University
AL

Annika Larsson (in collaboration with Mohammed Haji Younes)

Uppsala University and Research Lab at University of Arts, Crafts and Design in Stockholm
CS

Colin Seymour

University College London
KR

Kate Rogers

Department of Archaeology, University of Southampton
JA

Jaime Almansa-Sánchez

JAS Arqueología, Madrid / Incipit-CSIC
TV

Tanya Venture

The SCAPE Trust / University of Exeter
JA

Jesús Alonso

Independent Researcher
FM

Felipe Muñoz

Independent Researcher
GP

Guillermo Palomero

Complutense University of Madrid
AP

Angela Piccini

University of Bristol


Wednesday December 18, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Clarke Hall (Level 3) 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

9:30am

TAG40 | Excavating Archaeology: The Power of Process
When working on an excavation, we move down the stratigraphic profile of a site, stripping away layers as we define new contexts. In moving down through the soil, we build up an understanding of the site, adjusting our approach accordingly (Hodder 1999). But the work of archaeology does not end when objects are lifted from the ground. Processes such as conservation, restorations, and subsequent de-restorations add physical layers to the surface of objects as we attempt to organise and interpret them. We also build up by adding metaphorical layers of meaning. Finds become enmeshed with other objects through the generation of archival records, practices of storage and display, and through the making of reproductions.With the recent archival turn in archaeology (Baird 2011; Baird and McFadyen 2014) the excavation of these accumulated layers of meaning has become part of archaeologist’s work. This opens up the idea of the field site, demonstrating an urgent need to examine these processes of meaning making across a variety of settings. We invite commentators to discuss the fundamental methodological questions of where and how we construct archaeological knowledge and the power that these processes hold over our understanding and interpretation. Papers could consider, but are not limited to:

The production of knowledge in the archaeological record and excavations in the archive
The use of reproduction-making in learning about the past
Restoration and de-restoration as shaping perceptions of ancient objects and societies
Conservation as interpretationEthnography as a tool for excavating archaeological knowledge.

References:
Baird, J.A. 2011. Photographing the Dura Europa’s 1928-1937: An Archaeology of the Archive. American Journal of Archaeology 115(3), 427-446.
Baird, J.A. and McFadyen, L. 2014. Towards an Archaeology of Archaeological Archives. Archaeological Review from Cambridge 29(2), 14-31.
Hodder, I. 1999. The Archaeological Process: An Introduction. Blackwell Publishers: Oxford.

Organisers: Abbey Ellis; University of Leicester and Ashmolean Museum, Oxford • Beth Hodgett; Birkbeck College, University of London & Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford.

9:30 | Session organisers | Introduction

9:40 | Abbey Ellis, University of Leicester and Ashmolean Museum, Oxford | Cast in the Past: Histories Ancient and Modern

10:00 | Annelies Van de Ven, Université Catholique de Louvain | Questioning the Copy: Squeezes as Subjective Interpretations in the Archaeological Record

10:20 | Chloë Ward, UCL | Counting cards – Archiving the Excavation and Excavating the Archive

10:40 | Dr. Heather Keeble, Independent researcher | Many Hands in the Pot:
the production of archaeological knowledge in nineteenth-century Britain

11:00 | - | BREAK

11:30 | Beth Hodgett, Birkbeck College, University of London & Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford. | “Our footprints in these sands of time”: Time, travel and legacy in O.G.S. Crawford’s photographs of Sudan

11:50 | Dr. Katy Soar, University of Winchester | Mino-tourism: Picture postcards and the creation of the Minoans

12:10 | Jonathan Paul Mosca, University of Aberdeen | The Language of Archaeology: How the Presentation of Archaeological Research Changes in Different Languages

12:30 | Mark Dolan, University of Southampton & British Museum | Boats out of Water: Tracing the impact of whim, bias and disinterest on archaeological knowledge through Cypriot terracotta boat models

12:50 | Session organisers | Discussion

13:00 | - | END

Speakers
AE

Abbey Ellis

University of Leicester and Ashmolean Museum, Oxford
AV

Annelies Van de Ven

Université Catholique de Louvain
DH

Dr. Heather Keeble

Independent researcher
BH

Beth Hodgett

Birkbeck College, University of London & Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford.
DK

Dr. Katy Soar

University of Winchester
JP

Jonathan Paul Mosca

University of Aberdeen
MD

Mark Dolan

University of Southampton & British Museum


Wednesday December 18, 2019 9:30am - 1:00pm
Room 728 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

10:00am

Making archaeological comics **BOOKING REQUIRED**
** Please register using Eventbrite if you wish to attend this workshop ** 

This workshop starts at 10am and finishes at 12:30pm (including a 30 min coffee break)

This workshop is aimed at anyone interested in making comics relating to archaeology. The session will start with a series of 5-minute presentations by the workshop leaders, outlining their process of making comics. This will be followed by a short panel discussion.

The practical element of the workshop will include a series of drawing games and a chance for participants to plan, thumbnail or draw a short comic. Participants are welcome to work on comics arising from their own research, or to use suggestions provided on the day.

No drawing experience necessary.


Workshop Organisers:
Hannah Sackett (hannah.sackett@btinternet.com)
John Swogger (jgswogger@gmail.com)

Workshop Leaders:
Matt Hitchcock (University of Manchester)
Nick Overton (University of Manchester)
Hannah Sackett (Cartoonist and educator)
John Swogger (Archaeological Illustrator)
Katy Whitaker (University of Reading)


Wednesday December 18, 2019 10:00am - 12:30pm
Room 790 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

12:00pm

Women of Bloomsbury Walk
Join UCL Institute of Archaeology staff Charlotte Frearson and Louise Martin on a walk around Bloomsbury exploring the history of both the Women of UCL & the Women of Bloomsbury. Scientists, poets, artists, writers, actors, social reformers: join us in recognising these relatively unsung humans with talks, quotes from key works & ‘temporary blue plaque memorials’. The walk will be around 1 hour – come rain or come shine! The Institute of Archaeology's Therapy Dog Indy will be joining us on the walk and some 'Guerilla Blue Plaquing' may also be involved!

Those wanting to join Charlotte and Louise on the walk should meet at the conference registration reception just before 12pm.


Wednesday December 18, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm

1:00pm

Journal of Contemporary Archaeology: Meet the Editors
Meet with editors of the Journal of Contemporary Archaeology (Rodney Harrison, Alfredo González-Ruibal and Esther Breithoff) at the journal’s stand in the exhibition hall to discuss potential paper submissions, book, exhibition and film reviews, and/or themed issues and sections and to learn more about the journal’s aims and scope https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCA/about

Speakers
EB

Esther Breithoff

Birkbeck, University of London
RH

Rodney Harrison

Professor of Heritage Studies, University College London
Rodney Harrison is Professor of Heritage Studies at the UCL Institute of Archaeology and AHRC Heritage Priority Area Leadership Fellow. He is Principal Investigator of the AHRC-funded Heritage Futures Research Programme; Director of the Heritage Futures Laboratory at UCL; and leads... Read More →


Wednesday December 18, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Exhibitor's hall (Jeffrey Hall) 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

Between the Acts: a creative misguide round Bloomsbury **BOOKING REQUIRED**
**If you would like to join this tour please book ahead on Eventbrite**

Come with us on field trip: on a mis-guided tour of Bloomsbury. Setting off from UCL we'll spend around an hour to an hour an a half exploring the environs. A participatory experience aimed at the co-creation of knowledge, there'll be stops along the way to explore space and place through various mediums including sound, art and poetry. Influenced by counter-tourism; the Autonauts of the Cosmoroute and Sebald's Rings of Saturn we'll explore (by doing) the mis-guide as a creative tool for engagement. We'll disrupt boundaries and explore space emotionally and transgressively in the style of Lauren Elkin's Flaneuse. Will finding different ways to tell stories make us more effective at communicating the past? Or do we need to find different stories to tell? Or should we actually aim to divest power and resist the urge to 'tell' very much at all?Leaders:

Speakers
PF

Penelope Foreman

Clwyd Powys Archaeological Trust


Wednesday December 18, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Conference meeting point near to registration desk UCL Institute of Education (IOE) 20 Bedford Way London WC1H 0A

2:00pm

TAG50 | Erased from the Past: Bringing marginalised people into Archaeology
As more marginalised people are making their way into Archaeology we are coming to terms more with how those people are not represented in our research. Until more recently, the past has been written as though these people did not exist in the past. Increasingly, we are becoming aware that they did, but have been largely erased in archaeological narratives. Examples include the lack of discussion of gender beyond the Western binary, erasing homosexual relationships and gender dysphoria, erasing gendered bodily experiences (such as menstruation and menopause) and ‘whitewashing’ experiences of people of colour. This session invites discussion into research on erased people or practices that explores why this has happened and continues to happen. We invite short position papers proposing ways forward to redress these imbalances, with a focus on the ethics of such archaeological practice.

Organisers: Miller Power; Durham University • Zena Kamash; Royal Holloway University

14:00 | Zena Kamash, Royal Holloway University | Introduction

14:10 | Louise Fowler, MOLA | Gideon Mendel in Calais: what are the ethical implications?

14:20 | Iida Käyhkö, Royal Holloway, University of London | Truth to Power

14:30 | Henrietta Ali Ahmed, Royal Holloway | The Archaeology of Uncertainty

14:40 | Louise Fowler, MOLA; Iida Käyhkö, Royal Holloway, University of London; Henrietta Ali Ahmed, Royal Holloway | Panel Discussion 1

15:30 | - | BREAK

16:00 | Heba Abd El Gawad, Durham University | “So you think you are reconnecting local communities with their heritage? Well it’s you who is disconnected!!!”

16:10 | Laura Hampden, Museum Detox; Laura Hampden, Historic England, Museum Detox, CIfA Equality and Diversity Group | Black Women in the Archaeological Record.

16:20 | D. Kalani Heinz, University of California, Los Angeles | No Hetero!: Making way for alternative ways of knowing within archaeology

16:30 | Miller Power, Durham University | Theorising Queers in the Roman World

16:40 | Heba Abd El Gawad, Durham University; Laura Hampden, Museum Detox; Laura Hampden, Historic England, Museum Detox, CIfA Equality and Diversity Group; D. Kalani Heinz, University of California, Los Angeles; Miller Power, Durham University | Panel Discussion 2

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
ZK

Zena Kamash

Royal Holloway University
IK

Iida Käyhkö

Royal Holloway, University of London
HA

Henrietta Ali Ahmed

Royal Holloway
HA

Heba Abd El Gawad

Durham University
LH

Laura Hampden

Museum Detox
DK

D. Kalani Heinz

University of California, Los Angeles
MP

Miller Power

Durham University


Wednesday December 18, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 784 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG08 | The politics of things, agencies, and ontologies: finding common ground
Theoretical debate in archaeology might not be as polarised today as in the 1980s, but it still grapples with absolutely fundamental questions. Among the foremost trends in the current century so far are the emergence of new materialisms and approaches that ask ontological questions. These seek to challenge much of the conceptual and terminological framework employed in archaeology hitherto. As we approach 2020, though, there are signs of a push-back against these developments, and a number of critiques of different strands of these theories (e.g. symmetrical archaeology, entanglement theory) are beginning to emerge. One critical issue has to do with the ethical and political implications of different positions on objects, agents and ontologies. For, while there is considerable variety in the moral and ethical interpretations attached to different perspectives on the being of humans, animals and things, archaeologists on both sides in these exchanges actually tend to have much in common as progressive scholars with similar values and goals. In this round-table discussion, we seek to cut through some of the theoretical debate to understand better the basis for this common ground, and to find a positive unity of purpose for practical action that might make a difference in the world we inhabit. We intend to structure the discussion around four key questions:

1. How do politics and ethics intersect with ontology?

2. What have different archaeological approaches to objects achieved?

3. Is anthropocentrism inevitable, and what are its limitations?

4. How can we work more collaboratively to make future debate more constructive?

Organisers: Andy Gardner; UCL • Oliver Harris; University of Leicester

14:00 | Oliver Harris, University of Leicester; Andy Gardner, UCL; Eva Mol, UCL; Alice Samson, University of Leicester; Artur Ribeiro, University of Kiel; Israel Hinojosa Baliño, Durham University; Helia Marçal, Independent Researcher / Tate, London; Rhys Morgan, Southampton University | Panel

15:15 | - | BREAK

15:45 | Oliver Harris, University of Leicester; Andy Gardner, UCL; Eva Mol, UCL; Alice Samson, University of Leicester; Artur Ribeiro, University of Kiel; Israel Hinojosa Baliño, Durham University; Helia Marçal, Independent Researcher / Tate, London; Rhys Morgan, Southampton University | ...Continued

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
OH

Oliver Harris

University of Leicester
AS

Alice Samson

University of Leicester
AR

Artur Ribeiro

University of Kiel
IH

Israel Hinojosa Baliño

Durham University
HM

Helia Marçal

Independent Researcher / Tate, London
RM

Rhys Morgan

Southampton University


Wednesday December 18, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 826 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG02 | The Materiality of Folklore and Traditional Practices
Traditional ritual practices, happening outside or beyond more canonical or formal belief systems can take oral and material forms. Indeed, often such practices are characterised by a blending of the tangible and intangible, drawing on multisensory engagement with cultural and natural objects, place, songs, poems, dance and prayer. This session aims to explore how such traditions are expressed materially. Drawing on conceptual and theoretical developments within folklore, archaeology, ethnography and anthropology, such as the notion of structured deposition, bricolage, relational/assemblage approaches, feminist and queer perspectives, this session will explore the materiality and physicality of folklore, traditional and customary practices in Europe and beyond.

Organisers: David Petts; Durham University • Dr. Katy Soar; University of Winchester

14:00 | Session organisers | Introduction

14:05 | Zoe Crossland, Columbia University | Concerns about bodies and containment in 16th-17th century England

14:25 | Ethan Coyle White, UCL | In Search of the Cofgodas: History, Archaeology, and Folklore in Early Medieval England

14:45 | Miles Russell, Bournemouth University | An Archaeology of Myth-Fulfilment

15:05 | - | BREAK

15:35 | Alyssa Scott, University of California, Berkeley | Archaeology and Folkloristics at Tuberculosis Sanatoria in California

15:55 | Stephen Sherlock, Independent | TBC

16:15 | Cameron Moffett, English Heritage | Defense against the Evil Eye: evidence for magic at Roman Wroxeter

16:35 | Ceri Houlbrook, University of Hertfordhsire | Lessons from Love-Locks: The contemporary archaeology of a contemporary practice

16:55 | Session organisers | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
ZC

Zoe Crossland

Columbia University
Position at Company ABC.
MR

Miles Russell

Bournemouth University
AS

Alyssa Scott

University of California, Berkeley
SS

Stephen Sherlock

Independent
CM

Cameron Moffett

English Heritage
CH

Ceri Houlbrook

University of Hertfordhsire
DP

David Petts

Durham University
DK

Dr. Katy Soar

University of Winchester


Wednesday December 18, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 728 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG05 | Demography, Migration, Interaction: New Archaeological Narratives for the Past and the Present
Recent years have seen an increase in political narratives and propaganda focused on boundaries, borders and walls, primarily based on a mentality of ‘us’ versus ‘them’. At the same time, contemporary archaeological research has seen a resurgence of studies into prehistoric demography, driven by cross-disciplinary methods and techniques. Looking closely at issues of human migration and cross-cultural interaction across time and space, this session aims to highlight the value of archaeology as a tool for challenging current attitudes towards migrants. To this end, we invite papers that develop new archaeological narratives on co-existence, co-operation, conflict and/or exchange between different communities, thus demonstrating the significance of cross-cultural interaction to the human condition, as well as the long-term benefits of hybrid or ‘mixed’ communities. These narratives should however be placed firmly in the current socio-political context. What are the contemporary implications and entanglements of archaeological research focused on questions of demography, migration, and interaction? To enable this dialogue, we particularly welcome papers that approach these issues through a broad array of archaeological methods, including archaeological sciences (zooarchaeology, geoarchaeology, archaeobotany, osteoarchaeology), material culture studies (ceramics, lithics and metallurgy), and anthropological studies. We seek to discuss these topics from a broad temporal and geographical perspective, covering examples from the Palaeolithic to the Modern era, and from a diverse array of regions around the Globe. We particularly seek case studies from the Americas, Africa, Middle East, Asia, and Oceania.We encourage early career researchers, women and minorities to apply.

Organisers: Ana Catarina Vital; UCL Institute of Archaeology • Gwendoline Maurer; UCL Institute of Archaeology

14:00 | Ana Catarina Vital, UCL Institute of Archaeology; Gwendoline Maurer, UCL Institute of Archaeology | Introduction

14:10 | Gwendoline Maurer, UCL Institute of Archaeology | Diaspora Subsistence Strategies: The Kura Araxes in the 3rd Millennium BC Southern Levant

14:25 | Alicia Núñez-García, University of Edinburgh | Ubuntu! Phoenicians in Iberia, Syrians in Europe

14:40 | Yuyang Wang, Stanford University | Looking into the Shattered Mirrors: A Study of Destroyed Bronze Mirrors in Qin, Han, and Xiongnu Tombs

14:55 | Christian Langer M.A., Freie Universität Berlin | Researching ancient Egyptian deportations: political economy and scholarly discourse

15:10 | Sara Simões, Cambridge Archaeological Unit / STARQ- Sindicato dos Trabalhadores de Arqueologia (Portuguese Union for Archaeologists); Tânia Casimiro, IHC-NOVA University of Lisbon; José Pedro Henriques, IAP – Universidade NOVA de Lisboa; Vanessa Filipe, Independent Researcher | An archaeological perspective of African mobilities in Portugal between the 15th and the 19th centuries

15:25 | - | BREAK

15:55 | Lucy Timbrell, Professor Marta Mirazón Lahr, Leverhulme Centre of Human Evolutionary Studies, University of Cambridge | Characterising and exploring patterns of cranial shape variation in recent Aboriginal Australians

16:10 | Konstantinos P. Trimmis, University of Bristol; Christianne L. Fernée, University of Southampton | Εuromobile: Exploring migration narratives and mobility routes in the South East Europe from prehistory to the present

16:25 | Marte Spangen, Førsteamanuensis/Associate professor, Arctic University of Norway | Roads of the North – movement, interaction, and landscape negotiation in northern Norway

16:40 | Lauren Nicole Coughlin, University of Southampton | If nowhere else, they belong when they are in that class

16:55 | Alexandra E. T. Kriti, Headland Archaeology Ltd. / Kingston University of London | Cooking [at] the borders: The Taste of the Aegean Internationality(-ies)

17:10 | Ana Catarina Vital, UCL Institute of Archaeology; Gwendoline Maurer, UCL Institute of Archaeology | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
AC

Ana Catarina Vital

UCL Institute of Archaeology
GM

Gwendoline Maurer

UCL Institute of Archaeology
AN

Alicia Núñez-García

University of Edinburgh
YW

Yuyang Wang

Stanford University
KP

Konstantinos P. Trimmis

University of Bristol
CL

Christianne L. Fernée

University of Southampton
MS

Marte Spangen

Førsteamanuensis/Associate professor, Arctic University of Norway
LT

Lucy Timbrell: Professor Marta Mirazón Lahr

Leverhulme Centre of Human Evolutionary Studies, University of Cambridge
CL

Christian Langer M.A.

Freie Universität Berlin
SS

Sara Simões

Cambridge Archaeological Unit / STARQ- Sindicato dos Trabalhadores de Arqueologia (Portuguese Union for Archaeologists)
TC

Tânia Casimiro

IHC-NOVA University of Lisbon
VF

Vanessa Filipe

Independent Researcher
LN

Lauren Nicole Coughlin

University of Southampton
AE

Alexandra E. T. Kriti

Headland Archaeology Ltd. / Kingston University of London


Wednesday December 18, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 822 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG13 | Micro-worlds, materiality and human behaviour: Magnifying material science in explanations of technology
Studies of innovation and cultural transmission in material culture are scholarly obsessions as well as fundamental building blocks for regional and global archaeological narratives. The traditional emphasis on macroscopic artefact traits to explore shifting patterns of cultural variation remains dominant whilst the use of material science data to examine these questions, particularly in the context of production technology, has been slow to develop. Traits that define style and form take precedent over composition and texture.This session explores how we can better utilise material science data in building explanatory models for the evolution of technologies worldwide. It brings together a range of cross-disciplinary research projects that span different materials and continents, yet all using elemental and microscopic analyses to investigate variability in artefact production processes. Participants will demonstrate the utility of micro-scale characterizations for exploring themes ranging from purely aesthetical and sensorial to environmental and mechanical stimulants of change. Seeing no fundamental difference in the abilities of micro- and macro-scale artefact traits to address archaeological problems, we wish to probe the extent to which materials science data can generate new insights on patterns of technological behaviour.

Organisers: Miljana Radivojević; UCL Institute of Archaeology • Mike Charlton; UCL Institute of Archaeology

14:00 | Miljana Radivojević, UCL Institute of Archaeology | Intro

14:05 | Sally Herriett, Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Bristol / Truro College, University of Plymouth | What sort of fibre is that? An experimental approach to distinguishing aspects of skin-based material culture.

14:20 | Kate Fulcher, British Museum | Molecular evidence for the use of complex organic preparation methods for the treatment of the dead in Egypt in the 1st millennium BC

14:35 | Waka Kuboyama, University of Southampton | The Society Behind Crafting: Technologies and Chaîne Opératoire of Costa Rican Axe-god Jade Pendants

14:50 | Maja Miše, UCL Institute of Archaeology | Imitate, Assimilate, Innovate: technological aspects of ceramic production in Mediterranean city-states in the last centuries BC

15:05 | Patrick Degryse, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and Leiden University; Andrew J. Shortland, Cranfield University; Sarah Dillis, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven;
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and Vrije Universiteit Brussel; Alicia van Ham-Meert, University of Exeter; Peter Leeming, University of Exeter | Isotopic evidence for the equivalence of gold and yellow glass in the late Bronze Age

15:20 | - | BREAK

15:50 | Ian Freestone, UCL Institute of Archaeology | The Origins and Evolution of Early Glass-making Technologies: The Near East and China

16:05 | Ole F. Nordland, UCL | Slag chemistry to fill the gaps

16:20 | Peter Northover, School of archaeology, Oxford University | The Empirical Metallurgist

16:35 | Mike Charlton, UCL Institute of Archaeology | Bending the law:exploring technological opportunities in bloomery ironmaking

16:50 | Miljana Radivojević, UCL Institute of Archaeology; Mike Charlton, UCL Institute of Archaeology | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
MR

Miljana Radivojević

UCL Institute of Archaeology
SH

Sally Herriett

Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Bristol / Truro College, University of Plymouth
KF

Kate Fulcher

British Museum
WK

Waka Kuboyama

University of Southampton
MM

Maja Miše

UCL Institute of Archaeology
PD

Patrick Degryse

Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and Leiden University
AJ

Andrew J. Shortland

Cranfield University
SD

Sarah Dillis

Katholieke Universiteit Leuven;nKatholieke Universiteit Leuven and Vrije Universiteit Brussel
AV

Alicia van Ham-Meert

University of Exeter
PL

Peter Leeming

University of Exeter
IF

Ian Freestone

UCL Institute of Archaeology
PN

Peter Northover

School of archaeology, Oxford University
MC

Mike Charlton

UCL Institute of Archaeology


Wednesday December 18, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 828 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG17 | Investigating industrial pasts and legacies from multi- and interdisciplinary perspective
The topic of multi- and interdisciplinary research has been gaining traction in recent years. Studies of industrial archaeology and heritage have long utilised interdisciplinary methods and perspectives, being concerned with various kinds of evidence of industrial processes and legacies, both material and immaterial. In this session we explore the place and value of multi- and inter disciplinary practices within studies of industrial pasts and legacies. In this, we acknowledge the growing interest in these topics within other disciplines, such as economic and oral history, sociology, geography, environmental humanities, photography and art, amongst others.We seek to examine the current conditions of knowledge production, how new bodies of knowledge and practice are being formed, the shifts of power, and how they change us. Some questions that we seek to address are: What relationships are currently being forged and why, and in what ways do different perspectives coalesce or clash, and why? Does it matter what we call ourselves? How are multi- and inter disciplinary approaches being incorporated, while maintaining communication with a ‘home’ discipline? Are there any anxieties over politics, disciplinary histories, identity, funding, career paths, acceptance, and recognition? What are perceived as typical and unconventional forms of practice?

Organisers: Hilary Orange; Independent • Mike Nevell; University of Salford • Hanna Steyne; University of Manchester

14:00 | Session organisers | Introduction

14:10 | João Luís Sequeira, Universidade do Minho, Portugal | Humanizing industrial archaeology

14:30 | Hanna Steyne, University of Manchester | The industrialisation of Thames water management in the 19th century from many, multi- and inter-disciplinary perspectives

14:50 | Susan Lawrence, Archaeology, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia; Jude Macklin, Geography, Lincoln University, Lincoln, UK; Mark Macklin, Geography, Lincoln University, Lincoln, UK; Peter Davies, Archaeology, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia; Ian Rutherfurd, Geography, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; Ewen Silvester, Environment, Ecology and Evolution, La Trobe University, Albury-Wodonga, Australia; James Grove, Geography, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; Jodi Turnbull, Archaeology, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia | Rivers of gold: Mining legacies from the perspectives of archaeology, science and art

15:10 | Coralie Acheson, Arup | The Iron Bridge in mixed media: An artistic reflection on interdisciplinary research

15:30 | - | BREAK

16:00 | Ronan O'Donnell, Durham University | The archaeology of 20th century factory management: Four factories on the Team Valley Trading Estate

16:20 | Helen L Loney, University of Worcester; Andrew W Hoaen, University of Worcester | “Garbology” and the archaeology of industry: Field walking in the hinterlands of Royal Worcester Porcelain

16:40 | Hilary Orange, Independent; Mike Nevell, University of Salford; Hanna Steyne

, University of Manchester | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
JL

João Luís Sequeira

Universidade do Minho, Portugal
SL

Susan Lawrence

Archaeology, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
JM

Jude Macklin

Geography, Lincoln University, Lincoln, UK
MM

Mark Macklin

Geography, Lincoln University, Lincoln, UK
PD

Peter Davies

Archaeology, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
IR

Ian Rutherfurd

Geography, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
ES

Ewen Silvester

Environment, Ecology and Evolution, La Trobe University, Albury-Wodonga, Australia
JG

James Grove

Geography, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
JT

Jodi Turnbull

Archaeology, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
RO

Ronan O'Donnell

Durham University
HL

Helen L Loney

University of Worcester
AW

Andrew W Hoaen

University of Worcester
HO

Hilary Orange

UCL Institute of Archaeology
MN

Mike Nevell

University of Salford
HS

Hanna Steyne

University of Manchester


Wednesday December 18, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 777/80 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG23 | Museum Archaeology: Thinking Through Collections
There are several common misconceptions around museum archaeology. These include the assumption that it is simply a set of procedures for managing and exhibiting assemblages at the end of the archaeological process, and that it has had little impact on the development of, or relevance to, archaeological theory or museum going publics. This session seeks to challenge such characterisations and extend theorisation beyond gallery display to develop museum archaeology as a distinct area of reflexive individual and institutional research and practices integral to the broader discipline. In so doing, this session recognises museum archaeology as a political arena with an obligation to address recent discourses around class, gender, race, the public presentation of past peoples, and decolonisation. What is prioritised by and researched in museums, by whom, how and why? How do museum practices of assembly and reassembly of objects shape archaeological knowledge? How is archaeological praxis transformed or reinforced by the museum? What role does the museum visitor have?

Papers are invited that problematise and suggest new ways of thinking about historic, contemporary and future relationships between archaeological theory, museum collections, and the public, as well as the array of institutional and cultural paradigms through which archaeological enquiries are mediated and represented. Case studies and theoretical considerations that engage with the nature and status in the museum of archival field notes, photographic media, archaeological samples and replicas, alongside artefact assemblages, are encouraged. Similarly, papers that consider core museum practices (like documentation, cataloguing, storage, conservation and visitor engagement) as socially embedded and historically produced activities, rather than straightforward logistical issues, are welcome.

Organisers: Alice Stevenson; UCL • Morag Kersel; DePaul University

14:00 | Session organisers | Introduction

14:10 | Lucia Nixon, Wolfson College, Oxford | Messages from Mykene: Othering and Smothering.
Intersectional Orientalism and Sexism in a 2019 Museum Exhibition

14:35 | Despoina Markaki, University of Crete | Cretensis mare ignorant. An ambiguous archaeological collection in Crete

15:00 | Hannah Pethen, University of Liverpool, Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology | Making it up as they went along: Reconstructing the methods used to generate an early 20th century field pottery corpus and their implications for modern research in historically excavated museum collections

15:25 | - | BREAK

15:55 | Monika Stobiecka, University of Warsaw | Imagineering archaeology: reworking digital media in museums

16:20 | Morag M. Kersel, Department of Anthropology, DePaul University | Annexed Artifacts. Exhibitionary Bias in the public display of objects from the “Holy Land”

16:45 | Chloe Emmott, PhD candidate, University of Greenwich | Archaeology and Colonial Power - The British Mandate and the Palestine Archaeological

17:10 | Alice Stevenson, UCL | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
LN

Lucia Nixon

Wolfson College, Oxford
DM

Despoina Markaki

University of Crete
HP

Hannah Pethen

University of Liverpool, Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology
MM

Morag M. Kersel

Department of Anthropology, DePaul University
CE

Chloe Emmott: PhD candidate

University of Greenwich
MK

Morag Kersel

DePaul University


Wednesday December 18, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 731/6 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG28 | Beyond Biographies: Composite things in time and space
The Grimthorpe shield was excavated from a Middle Iron Age grave in East Yorkshire in 1868. It is generally discussed as a singular shield, but a recent re-examination of this object concluded that it was formed from a mixture of new and old fittings, some of which probably once belonged to older shields.How should we think of this object? Although it has been crystallised through deposition in its current configuration as a single shield, it is simultaneously several other objects at once, presenting an interesting paradox.This session emerges from the observation that complex, composite objects, such as the Grimthorpe Shield, do not always fit comfortably within existing models used by archaeologists to explain the processes of things in time and space. Object biographies have long been a popular way of describing the ‘lives’ of objects and recent discussions have suggested ways of building upon or going beyond this concept. However, we argue that composite things can present problems in these approaches, creating tensions between the whole and its parts. We aim to explore new modes of envisaging the ontological complexities of composite objects and other types of assemblage, with emphases on scale and the paradox between singular and multiple. We welcome papers that seek novel approaches to composite things and assemblages in time and space, using examples from any archaeological period(s) and covering topics such as:

• Modification
• Repair
• Curation (ancient and modern)
• Fragmentation
• Refashioning
• Recycling
• Re-appropriation

Organisers: Helen Chittock; AOC Archaeology Group • Matt Hitchcock; University of Manchester • Matthew G. Knight; National Museums Scotland

14:00 | Helen Chittock, AOC Archaeology Group; Matt Hitchcock, University of Manchester; Matthew G. Knight, National Museums Scotland | Beyond Biographies: Introducing composite things in time and space

14:20 | Jody Joy, Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Cambridge | ’Timeless’ objects? Unravelling the histories of composite things

14:40 | Staffan Lunden, University of Gothenburg | Making objects, making heritage

15:00 | Sophie Moore, Newcastle University | The secret lives of Pithoi: Long-term Anatolian storage solutions from a 6th century house at Sagalassos, Turkey.

15:20 | - | BREAK

15:50 | Daisy-Alys Vaughan, Newcastle University | Displaying Composite Histories: Creating and curating biographies with the Shefton Collection of Greek and Etruscan Archaeology

16:10 | Anna Garnett, Petrie Museum, UCL |

16:30 | Jennifer Peacock, Independent Researcher | Context is key: Historic Houses as Archaeological Assemblages

16:50 | Julian Thomas, University of Manchester | Beyond Biographies in Neolithic Material Processes

17:10 | Andy Jones, University of Southampton | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
HC

Helen Chittock

AOC Archaeology Group
MH

Matt Hitchcock

University of Manchester
MG

Matthew G. Knight

National Museums Scotland
JJ

Jody Joy

Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Cambridge
SL

Staffan Lunden

University of Gothenburg
SM

Sophie Moore

Newcastle University
DV

Daisy-Alys Vaughan

Newcastle University
AG

Anna Garnett

Petrie Museum, UCL
JP

Jennifer Peacock

National Trust
JT

Julian Thomas

University of Manchester
AJ

Andy Jones

University of Southampton


Wednesday December 18, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 790 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG30 | Tropicalís(i)mo: exploring comparative archaeologies between Amazonia and the Maya lowlands
The broad lowland Neotropical macro region has potentially much to offer to current thinking about the emergence of social power; demographic growth, resilience and adaptation in the face of different and/or changing environmental conditions; and links between different socio-historical trajectories, landscape transformation/degradation, and climate change. However, archaeological studies focused on different lowland regions of the Neotropics are fragmented along either national or cultural lines. They reflect different research traditions (e.g. Mayanists, Amazonianists) and are - generally speaking - strongly imprinted by a consideration of the reciprocal effects of human communities and environmental change. Despite the growing importance of a comparative perspective in archaeology, it remains to be seen whether tropical regions between Amazonia and the Maya lowlands can be meaningfully compared. In this session we seek to establish a forum to develop a comparative perspective focused on the archaeology of the Neotropical lowlands. We invite contributions on general questions such as:

• Do the ‘tropics’ constitute a valid framework for archaeological comparison?
• What are the commonalities that exist in approaches, methods and techniques?
• Are the main research questions from both regions comparable?
• What is the impact of different national and international archaeological traditions?
• How are archaeological reconstructions reflective of ethnographic or ethnohistorical assumptions?
• What is the relevance of current research for local communities across these regions?

We welcome and encourage contributions with a comparative and interdisciplinary angle within the lowland Neotropics.

Organisers: Manuel Arroyo Kalin; UCL • Eva Jobbova; UCD

14:00 | Eva Jobbova, UCD; Manuel Arroyo Kalin , UCL | Introduction to sessions

14:10 | Julie A. Hoggarth, Baylor University, Texas | Climate and Cultural Developments in the Maya Lowlands and Greater Amazonia

14:30 | Mark Robinson, University of Exeter | Methods and relevance for comparative archaeologies of tropical Central and South America

14:50 | Andrew R. Wyatt, Middle Tennessee State University; Helena Pinto-Lima, Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi; Laura Furquim, Universidade de São Paulo | Household Archaeology in Amazonia: The Applicability of Archaeobotanical Research from the Maya Lowlands

15:10 | - | BREAK

15:40 | Jaroslav Źrałka, Jagiellonian University, Cracow; Monika Banach, Jagiellonian University | ‘Among the ruins and mudholes’: Relevance of archaeological research for the indigenous people in the Maya area

16:00 | Panayotis Kratimenos, UCL | Varying theoretical paradigms across national/regional lines in the Maya world

16:20 | J Julian Garay, UCL Institute of Archaeology | “¿Los Taínos sabían usar muchas plantas?”: The current state of Archaeobotanical research in the pre-Columbian Caribbean.

16:40 | Jose R. Oliver, UCL | Plural ‘societies’ in Ancient Orinoco: MG Smith Revisited

17:00 | Eva Jobbova, UCD; Manuel Arroyo Kalin, UCL | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
JA

Julie A. Hoggarth

Baylor University, Texas
MR

Mark Robinson

University of Exeter
AR

Andrew R. Wyatt

Middle Tennessee State University
HP

Helena Pinto-Lima

Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi
LF

Laura Furquim

Universidade de São Paulo
JZ

Jaroslav Źrałka

Jagiellonian University, Cracow
MB

Monika Banach

Jagiellonian University
JJ

J Julian Garay

UCL Institute of Archaeology


Wednesday December 18, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Clarke Hall (Level 3) 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG42 | Fact or fiction: the power of communities with knowledge of their pasts
What are the benefits of local communities being involved in public archaeology and caring for heritage – and to whom? We welcome 10-minute position papers that promote or critique how publics are empowered and/or enriched by a knowledge of, and engagement with, the past – and how these relate to local, regional and national identity. Position papers should respond to one or more of the following prompts – or raise their own (related to the theme!):

Does knowledge of the past give communities power, add to notions of identity and cultural heritage – or if not, what is community archaeology for?
How do we measure the impact of an intangible feeling of place, identity or general wellbeing that results from a ‘successful’ community project – should we even try?
Should these questions be our concern as archaeologists, if the ‘prime directive’ is the excavation and understanding of a site, with preservation by record or in-situ?
Are such outcomes for other disciplines to study once the trenches are backfilled and the info-boards are in place?
Where would this stance leave the HLF model of funding community projects?
Has this financial model driven the situation too far in favour of assumed outcomes and impact?

Organisers: David Jennings; University of York • Harald Fredheim; University of York

14:00 | David Jennings, University of York | Introduction

14:05 | Hilary Leathem, University of Chicago | Heritage and its Discontents: The Power Dynamics of Heritage Projects in Southern Mexico.

14:25 | Catriona Cooper, University of Cambridge / University of York | Stories in the Sky: community groups and storytelling at Park Hill flats

14:45 | Nathaniel Welsby, University of Lancashire | What does archaeology actually mean to those in primary education?

15:05 | Claire Boardman, University of York | communal memory and social cohesiveness

15:25 | - | BREAK

15:55 | Hayley Saul, Western Sydney University; Emma Waterton, Western Sydney University | Heritage and Affect in Nepal’s Post-Disaster Recovery: Working with the Community of Langtang

16:40 | Harald Fredheim, University of York; David Jennings, University of York | Q&A and Discussant conclusions

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
DJ

David Jennings

University of York
HL

Hilary Leathem

University of Chicago
CC

Catriona Cooper

University of Cambridge / University of York
NW

Nathaniel Welsby

University of Lancashire
HS

Hayley Saul

Western Sydney University
EW

Emma Waterton

Western Sydney University
CB

Claire Boardman

University of York
HF

Harald Fredheim

University of York


Wednesday December 18, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 739 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL

2:00pm

TAG51 | Conceptualising Resistance in Archaeology: From Prehistory to Occupying Wall Street
The notion of resistance is receiving a great deal of attention in the social sciences, but at the same time its productiveness is at risk due to the heterogeneity of meanings that it encompasses, ranging from violent and organised opposition to small scale, everyday acts of dissidence. The ‘soft version’ of the concept is due to James Scott (1990), according to whom every small dissident practice can be labelled as resistance as long as it bears that intentionality. However, this conceptualisation has been accused of accepting as resistance practices that are in fact trivial. In contrast, more radical approaches have argued that power exists within every network of relationships, and its visibility and functioning change depending on the processes of dissolution/resistance that operate within human societies. Following González-Ruibal (2014), processes of resistance can be characterised as a spectrum, which depending on intentionality, capacity and visibility, allows to distinguish between resilience, resistance and rebellion. Archaeology is in a privileged position to analyse issues of resistance and power, as it allows us to understand how the past (memories, habits, traditions) and material culture are constitutive elements of both. This session invites critical contributions to these debates, focusing particularly in the following:

• Theorisation of the notion of resistance and its application in Archaeology.
• Theorisation of key concepts related with resistance, such as power and state, from an archaeological perspective.
• Analysis of resistance practices in any archaeological context, but particularly colonial/imperial.
• Analysis of resistance practices as a tool against inequality.
• Analysis of resistance practices in state societies/societies against the state.

Organisers: Manuel Fernández-Götz; University of Edinburgh • Guillermo Diaz de Liano del Valle; University of Edinburgh • Felipe Criado-Boado; CSIC • Carlos Tejerizo-García; Incipit-CSIC

14:00 | Session organisers | Introduction

14:05 | Manuel Fernández-Götz, University of Edinburgh | Communities against the state: resistance to hierarchy in preindustrial societies

14:20 | Ana G. San Martín, Brown University | Metaphors to resist by

14:35 | Beatrijs de Groot, University of Edinburgh | Resisting technological change: how does it work and how can we recognise it?

14:50 | Guillermo Diaz de Liano del Valle, University of Edinburgh | Resistance in times of ontological uncertainty

15:05 | - | BREAK

15:35 | Rachel Cartwright, University of Minnesota | Resistance is Futile: The transition to Christianity in Iceland

15:50 | Eduardo Herrera Malatesta, Leiden University | Counter-mapping the Spanish invasion: A multiscalar and multitemporal approach of the indigenous resistance in Haytí

16:05 | Alexander Aston, School of Archaeology, University of Oxford | Flame of the Red Flag: Ecologies of Resistance from the Paris Commune to Present

16:20 | Enrique Moral de Eusebio, Universitat Pompeu Fabra | When Sexualities Clash: Ethnosexual Conflicts and Resistances during the Spanish Colonisation of the Mariana Archipelago

16:35 | Jaime Almansa-Sánchez, JAS Arqueología, Madrid / Incipit-CSIC | Resistance and resilience in the management of archaeological heritage

16:50 | Carlos Tejerizo-García, Incipit-CSIC | Franco's craving: archaeology of repression and resistance of the Spanish antifrancoist guerrilla

17:05 | Alfredo González-Ruibal, Incipit-CSIC | Discussion

17:30 | - | END

Speakers
MF

Manuel Fernández-Götz

University of Edinburgh
AG

Ana G. San Martín

Brown University
BD

Beatrijs de Groot

University of Edinburgh
GD

Guillermo Diaz de Liano del Valle

University of Edinburgh
RC

Rachel Cartwright

University of Minnesota
EH

Eduardo Herrera Malatesta

Leiden University
AA

Alexander Aston

School of Archaeology, University of Oxford
EM

Enrique Moral de Eusebio

Universitat Pompeu Fabra
JA

Jaime Almansa-Sánchez

JAS Arqueología, Madrid / Incipit-CSIC


Wednesday December 18, 2019 2:00pm - 5:30pm
Room 802/4 20 Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AL